スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」英日対訳

マーチ王ジョン・フィリップ・スーザの自叙伝を、英日対訳で見てゆきます。

第1章(1)英日対訳・スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」

CHAPTER 1 

FIDDLING VERSUS BAKING 

SELF-INFLICTED ILLNESS AND ITS PENALTY 

SCHOOL DAYS 

THE AGONIES OF SOLFEGGIO 

THE CONSERVATORY 

A CONCERT TRAGEDY 

第1章 

バイオリンを弾くか、それともパンを焼くか 

自業自得の病気 

学校での日々 

イヤなレッスン 

音楽教室 

公演の日の大失態 

 

1 

Whether pastry and music can be prevailed upon to go hand in hand is a question. Of course there is one classic instance ― M. Rageuneau in Cyrano de Bergerac, whose pastry-cooks delighted in presenting him with a lyre of pie crust! The fact remains, however, that I once came very near being a baker instead of a bandmaster. 

パンやお菓子を焼くこと、それと音楽を仕事にすること、この2つを両立させることは、中々の問題だ。勿論、有名な前例が1つある。戯曲「シラノ・ド・ベルジュラック」の登場人物ラグノ氏だ。パン職人達が彼にリラ(ギリシャ竪琴)の形をしたパイ皮を与えると喜ぶ、というあのラグノ氏だ。実は私は、昔もうチョットのところで、吹奏楽の団長ではなく、パン焼き職人になりかけたことがあったのだ。 

 

2 

A violinist begins a tone with a turn of the wrist which may best be described as the compelling impulse. A compelling impulse turned me baker's apprentice! My father had enrolled me in the conservatory of music of Professor John Esputa, Washington, D. C., and at the end of my last year there, our pleasant relationship of master and pupil was marred by a personal combat. 

バイオリン奏者は手首の技を使って音を発信する。もうチョット上手く言えば、頭で考えず本能で、音を鳴らすのだ。その「本能」のせいで、私はパン屋の見習いになってしまったのだ!父は私にバイオリンを習わせようと、ワシントンの音楽学校で教鞭をとっているジョン・エスプータ氏のところへ通わせた。良い師弟関係だったが、ある日2人の気分が噛み合わずケンカとなり、関係が壊れてしまったのである。 

 

3 

The professor had been afflicted with boils, and was reclining in a hammock swung near the stove in the recitation room, when I came for my violin lesson. I observed that he was in a very bad humor but began my exercises, unheeding. Nothing I did met with his approval. Finally he told me to “draw a long bow.” 

先生は、おできに苦しんでいて、私がバイオリンを持って訪れると、レッスンをする部屋の、暖炉の側の吊るし椅子にふんぞり返っていた。ものすごく機嫌が悪そうに見えたが、私は気にせず楽器を弾き始めた。その日は私がやることなすこと、全部先生のお気に召さない。「おい、チャンと弓を長く使って弾き給え。」 

 

4 

“I am drawing the bow as long as I can.” I said. 

That seemed to incense him greatly and he shouted, “Don't you dare contradict me!” 

“But I am drawing the bow as long as I can.” I repeated. “My arm is up against the wall now.” 

「目一杯、長く使って弾いてますよ。」私は言った。 

どうやらこの一言が引き金となった。先生は激高して「私に喧嘩を売ろうっていうのか!」 

「でも目一杯、長く使って弾いてますって。」私はくり返し言った。「もう腕が壁についちゃってますよ。」 

 

5 

He was holding in one hand a valuable violin bow, recently presented to him. Just what he intended to do, I do not know, but in his anger he jerked the bow back and struck the stove, breaking the bow in half. His rage knew no bounds! 

先生は値の張るバイオリンの弓を手に持っていた。最近誰かから贈られたものだ。何を思ったか知らないが、先生は怒りに任せて、その弓を急に振りかざすと、暖炉に叩きつけて、真っ二つに折ってしまった。先生の怒りは、もう手がつけられない状態である! 

 

6 

“Get out of here,” he yelled, “before I kill you!” Taking my fiddle by the neck, I said clearly, “You attempt to kill me and I'll smash this fiddle over your head.” 

“Get out,” he raged. 

“I'll get out,” I replied, “but don't you dare hit me, because if you do you'll get the worst of it.” 

I put my instrument in its green bag and walked home. 

先生は怒鳴った「出ていけ、でないとぶっ殺すぞ!」私はバイオリンを構えたまま、キッパリと言った「やろうってのか?だったら、こっちもこの楽器で、アンタのドタマかち割るぞ!」 

「出ていけ」彼は怒りに任せて叫んだ。 

「出てってやるよ」私は応えた。「だがな、もしアンタの方から手を出しやがったら、痛い目に遭わせてやるからな。」 

私は楽器を緑のバッグに片付けると、家路を歩いた。 

 

7 

My father, sensing something wrong, said, “What's the trouble?” 

“Oh, I have just a fight with Esputa,” I answered and, still shaking with wrath, explained the whole thing. 

父は、何か良からぬことが起きたことを察したのか、こう言った「どうした?」「あぁ、エスプータの野郎と喧嘩してさ」私は応えた。まだ怒りに震えながら、私は事の顛末を話した。 

 

8 

“Well,” said my father, “I suppose you don't want to be a musician. Is there anything else you would prefer?” 

With a heart full of bitterness I said, “Yes; I want to be a baker.” 

“A baker?” 

“Yes; a baker.” 

「なるほどな」父が言った。「お前、音楽家になる気が失せたようだが、他にやりたいことでもあるのか?」 

私は怒りで頭に血が上った状態で、こう言った「うん、パン屋にでもなろうかと思ってるよ。」 

「パン屋だと?」 

「うん、パン屋だよ。」 

 

9 

“Well, he mused, “I'll see what I can do to get you a position in a bakery. I'll go and attend to it right away,” and out he went. 

「そうか」父はチョット考えてから「そしたら、どこか引き受けてくれるパン屋がいるか、やってみようじゃないか。善は急げって言うからな」。そういと、父は出かけていった。 

 

10   

In about half an hour he came back and said, “I saw Charlie (the baker just two blocks away) and he says he will be glad to take you in and teach you the gentle art of baking bread and pies; but,” he added, “I have noticed that bakers as a rule are not very highly educated, and I believe if you would educate yourself beyond the average baker, it would tend to your financial improvement in this world at least; so I insist, as gently as a father can, that you keep on going to public school and pay no attention to your music. Give that up, and when you are through school the baker can start you.” 

30分ほど経って、父は戻ってくると、こう言った「チャーリーに会ってきたよ(2街区先のパン屋)。喜んでお前さんに、パン焼きとパイ焼きをしっかり仕込んでやるってさ。だがな、」父は続けて「パン屋と言えば、得てしてそんなに高度な学問を修めてるってわけじゃないようだ。だから、その部分を自力で、並のパン屋を上回れば、少なくとも金儲けで良い方向に持っていけるだろうよ。という訳でな、父親としてここはキッチリしておきたい。学校にはチャンと通え。そして音楽には目をくれるな。スッパリ諦めて、学校をしっかり卒業したら、自分でパン屋としてやって行き始めればいいだろう。」 

 

11 

Father then went on to say, “The baker has consented that you come tonight. You should be there by half-past eight.” 

父は更に続けてこう言った「チャーリーは、今夜から来て良いと言ってくれている。8時半までには必ず行けよ。」 

 

12 

That night I went to the bakery, and I am sure that no apprentice ever received such kindness as was shown me by Charlie and his wife and his journeyman bakers. I was there all night, and in the morning helped load the wagon and went out with the driver delivering bread to the various customers. I was particularly impressed by the intelligence of the horse, who knew every customer's front door along the route. 

その夜、私はそのパン屋へ出かけていった。今になって思うことだが、チャーリーさんとその奥様、そして店の職人さん達。あれほど親切にしてもらえるパン屋の見習いなど、いないだろう。日没から翌朝までの勤務で、朝になると馬車に商品を積み込んで、御者と一緒に出かけ、色々なお客様達にパンを配達するのだ。特に私が感心したのが、馬車を引く馬の賢さだ。配達ルート上にある、お客様達の家の玄関ドアを、一つ一つちゃんと認識しているのである。 

 

13 

After I got back to the bakery about eight in the morning, I went down home, ate my breakfast and, since my father had said he wanted me to be a highly educated baker, I went to school. I had probably half an hour's sleep that night. The bakers, after all the bread was in the ovens and the pies were ready to be baked, threw a blanket on the troughs and took forty winks of sleep, and so did I. 

配達を終えて店に戻るのが、朝の8時頃。それから私は家に帰ると、朝食をとって、父が希望する「高度な学問を修めたパン屋」になるべく、学校へと向かった。あの晩、私の睡眠時間は30分位だったろう。職人さん達は、パンを全て窯に入れて、パイを後は焼くだけと言うところまで仕上げたら、生地をこねる鉢に大きな布を掛けて、40分仮眠をとる。私もそのようにした。 

 

14 

When I came home from school that afternoon I suddenly lost interest in playing baseball and hung around the house. After supper I went up to the bakery for my second night. 

その日の午後、学校から帰宅すると、野球をしに行こうという気はすぐに失せて、家の中でボンヤリ過ごしていた。夕食を済ませると、パン屋での勤務2日目だ。 

 

15 

As I look back on it, I remember thinking that the baker and his assitants and his wife were slightly severe with me, for I was kept on the jump pretty constantly the whole night. When everything was in the ovens and we had had our usual half hour's sleep, we started loading the wagons. I went around delivering bread, returning home about eight o'clock, with an appetite, to be sure, but very drowsy. At school that day I learned nothing, and when night came I dragged myself to the shop. Alas, the baker was no longer the kindly employer, but a dictator of the worst description, and I was hounded at every step. About half past twelve the baby upstairs began to cry and the baker's wife snapped at me, “Here, you, go on up and rock the cradle.” 

今思い返してみると、チャーリーさんと奥様、そして職人さん達は、チョットだけ私に厳しいなと、考えていたことが記憶にある。2日目は夜通し結構忙しくしていたのだ。窯入れが全て済んで、いつも通り30分ほど仮眠を取って、馬車に積み込みを始める。パンの配達にまわり、8時頃帰宅するのだが、お腹は空いているものの、当然のことながら、凄まじい睡魔に襲われている。その日学校にいても、全然勉強にならなかった。夜が来れば、店へと体を引きずってゆく。こんな具合だから、チャーリーさんも、さすがに親切な雇い主ではいられない。きつい言い方だが独裁者になってしまう。私はやることなすこと、一つ一つ叱られてしまった。0時半過ぎ頃だったか、上の階で寝ていた赤ちゃんが泣き出した。奥様は私を追い立てるように「ほら、あんた、上に行って、ゆりかごであやして来て頂戴ね。」 

 

16 

I was only half awake, as I wearily mounted the stairs, and I must have fallen asleep before I had rocked the cradle three times, although Master Baby was yelling in my ears! I was awakened by a smart cuff and “You miserable lummox” from the busy baker-lady. 

半分寝かかった状態で、ヘロヘロになりながら階段を上がった。多分私は、「ご主人さま」であるその赤ちゃんが、耳元でピーピー言っているにも関わらず、2度、3度とゆりかごであやすことも出来ずに、寝落ちしてしまったのだろう。平手打ちを耳たぶに受けて目が覚めると、忙しくしていた奥様だった「コラ、なさけないゾ、おバカさん」。 

 

17 

When I reached home the next morning after delivering the bread again, I was absolutely tired out. My father said, “How do you feel this morning?” with a solicitude that did not ring true to me. Before I could answer, I had fallen asleep. He woke me up, called my mother and said, 

翌朝もパンの配達を済ませ、その後帰宅した。私は疲れ果ててしまっていた。父が言った「今朝は大丈夫か?」私の体を気遣う言葉だが、本気で言っているようには思えなかった。応えようとするも、睡魔に襲われてしまう。父は私に目を開けさせると、母を呼んでこう言った。 

 

18 

“Give the boy some breakfast and put him to bed. Let him sleep all day. Of course you want to be a baker, don't you, Philip?”  

「こいつに朝飯食べさせて、そしたらベットまで連れてってやってくれ 

。今日は一日寝かせてやろう。ところでフィリップ、お前、将来の夢はパン屋だったよな?」 

 

19 

“No,” I moaned; “I'd rather die than be a baker!” “Then” he said, “I think you had better make it up with Esputa and start in with your music again.” 

「いや」私はうめくように言った。「パン屋になるくらいなら、死んだほうがマシかも。」「そうか。」父が言った。「だったらエスプータと仲直りして、もう一度音楽の方でしっかりやることだな。」 

 

20 

Thus it was that my father brought Professor Esputa and myself together again and we buried the hatchet for good. Even after that (years later I orchestrated a mass for him) we were the best of friends. To prove my sincerity, I studied hard and made great progress in orchestration, harmony and sightreading. 

こうして、父はエスプータ先生と私を仲介してくれて、私達は金輪際ケンカをやめた。それどころか、私達はお互い最良の友人関係を持つことが出来た(数年後、私は先生のために、ミサ曲を1曲書いている)。先生に対して本気を示そうと、私は勉強に打ち込み、管弦楽法や和声法、そして初見演奏力と、メキメキと力をつけていった。 

 

21 

The incident of the bakery is ample proof of my father's kindly wisdom and common sense. We were, withal, an odd family. Father, being a Portuguese born in Spain, remained a votary of the daily siesta. Mother supplied the Nordic energy, and I, being the first boy, was inclined to despotism over my devoted parents. I was born in Washington, D. C. , on the sixth day of November, 1854, and a tyrannical youngster I must have been. When I reached my fifth year Mother refused to allow me my full quota of doughnuts, and I informed her she would be “sorry later on,” planning meanwhile what I intended to be a cruel revenge. 

パン屋の一件で十分伝わったと思うが、当時としては、父は優しく、知恵と常識の人だった。その上私達家族は、これまた当時としては風変わりだった。父はスペイン生まれのポルトガル系。アメリカに来ても、毎日の昼寝を熱愛し続けた。母は北欧系の元気印。そして、こんなに家族思いの両親に対し、私は、長男であったこともあり、二人を凌駕してやろう、などといつも企んでいた。私は1854年11月6日、ワシントンで生まれた。傍から見れば、きっとモンスターチャイルドだっただろう。5歳になった頃のことだった。ドーナツを云々の数だけ食べたい、と言った私に対して、母は少ししかくれなかった私は母に「そんなこと言ったら、後で知らないよ」と通告しつつ、ひどい目に合わせてやろうと企んでいた。 

 

22 

It was raining hard, and I moved out a plank in our front yard, placed it on two trestles, and then proceeded to make it my bed. In fifteen minutes I was soaked to the skin, and in half an hour my mother discovered me shivering and chattering with cold. I was carried into the house and put to bed. In a few days pneumonia developed and I was not able to leave my home for two years. My warning to my poor mother was correct ― she was sorry later on! 

決行の日、雨が激しく降っていた。私は大きな板を1枚、前庭に運び出すと、架台を2つ用意して、寝床を作った。15分もそこに横たわっていると、服はビショビショになり、30分経ったところで母が気づいた。私は風邪をひいて体が震え、歯がガチガチと言っていた。家の中に担ぎ込まれると、ベッドに運ばれた。2,3日すると肺炎が悪化し、私は2年間、家から自由に出歩くことができなくなってしまった。母には気の毒だったが、通告は実行に移され、後に母はこれを悔やんだという。 

 

23 

Had I exterminated Sousa on that rebellious day, in my heartless attempt to punish Mother for having refused me the extra cruller, a kindly musical public would never have given me the title of “March King,” King Edward VII would have presented his Victorian Order to some more deserving artist, the French Government would have bestowed the palm of the Academy on some other fortunate mortal, and five Presidents of the United States would have sought another bandmaster than myself. 

この反抗期に、揚げ菓子を余計に食べさせてくれなかったからといって、母を懲らしめてやろうなどと、心無い試みをして、もし私がスーザ家を断絶させてしまっていたら、今頃どうなっていただろうか。心温かい音楽ファンの皆様から「マーチ王」などと呼ばれることもなかっただろう。エドワード7世英国王からのビクトリア勲章は、もっと然るべき音楽家へ授与されたことだろう。フランス政府からのアカデミー勲章は、他の幸運な輩へ授与されたことだろう。5人の歴代のアメリカ大統領から、海兵隊バンドの楽長を任ぜらたのは、私以外の人物であっただろう。 

 

24 

During the two years of my illness my sister Tinnie and my father taught me to read and write and I became quite a student. It was a very common thing, however, for me to hear from some whispering neighbor, “I don't believe they will ever raise that boy!” 

When I was at last able to be out again I was sent to a little private school opposite my father's house on 7th Street, from there to a larger one half way down the block, and, soon after, I applied for admission to the primary department of the public school in our district. I was there only a few hours when I was transferred to the secondary school; it seemed that the teacher thought I knew too much for a primary pupil! So I spent the rest of the term at the secondary and then was transferred to the intermediate, where I remained the following year, I was then about nine years old, and at ten I was in grammar school. 

肺炎で療養中の2年間、姉のティニーと父が、私に読み書きを教えてくれたおかげで、私はしっかりと学問を修めることができた。だが、「あんな子、よく面倒見る気になるわよね、ここの家!」などと、ご近所がヒソヒソ言っているのを、私は頻繁に耳にしていた。ようやく外を自由に出歩けるようになると、私はまず、7番街の父が使っていた家の向かい側の小さな私立学校へ入れられ、そこから次に半街区下ったところにある少し大きめの学校へと移り、その後、実家のある学区の公立学校の第1学年へ、編入を申請した。そこでは2,3時間くらいしか授業を受けなかったこともあり、セカンダリースクール第7学年)へ移ることになった。担当教員が、幼児科の生徒にしては十分すぎる学力だ、と判断なさったようである。そこで残りの期間を過ごすと、その上の過程編入され、そこで卒業まで在籍することになる。その時私は9歳。10歳になると、在籍先はグラマースクールになった。