スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」英日対訳

マーチ王ジョン・フィリップ・スーザの自叙伝を、英日対訳で見てゆきます。

第2章(1/3)英日対訳・スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」

CHAPTER 2 

第2章 

 

WASHINGTON IN THE SIXTIES 

THE GRAND REVIEW 

“I'VE BIN FIGHTIN” 

A BOY “ON THE NAVY YARD” 

FATHER AND I 

MUSICAL MUTINY 

THE CIRCUS AND FATHER'S ANTIDOTE 

IN THE MARINE CORPS AT THIRTEEN 

STUDENT, TEACHER AND SOLOIST 

FIDDLING IN FLOODTIME 

TRIALS OF YOUNG COMPOSER 

1860年代のワシントン 

グランドレビュー 

私は戦ってきた 

ネイビーヤードの男の子たるもの

父と私 

音楽一揆

サーカスと父のなだめ 

海兵隊員は13歳 

弟子として、師匠として、そしてソリストとして 

洪水の中でのバイオリン演奏 

若き作曲家の試練 

 

 

In my boyhood Washington was just a sleepy Southern town. There were omnibuses but of course no trolley cars and the appearance of the first horse-car was a momentous event. The street railway company decided to equip its conductors with a sort of portable cash register worn around the neck like a yoke. One conductor refused to wear it ― we learned later that he was “well-fixed” and lived in a fine residence on the outskirts of Washington. When cable-cars arrived, the drivers appeared in all the glory of great raccoon coats; I have no doubt that I regarded them with much the same admiration and awe with which the pre-school boy regards the 'coon coats of college undergraduates.  

私が子供の頃のワシントンは、これと言って活気のあるわけではない、南部に拓かれた一都市にすぎない、といった雰囲気であった。乗合馬車は走っていたものの、路面電車などあるはずもなく、鉄道馬車がお目見えしたときには、一大イベントになった。その鉄道馬車の会社は、車掌全員に、見た目ヨークのような、携帯用首掛け運賃処理機を持たせていた。車掌の一人が、その処理機を携行することを拒否ししたことが話題となったが、後にその車掌は、ワシントン郊外の高級住宅地に住まいを持つ、「お金持ち」であったことが分かった。市内にケーブルカーがお目見えしたときには、運転手達はみな、格好いいラクーンコートでビシッと決めていた。当時、学校に上る前の少年達といえば、大学生達がラクーンコートを着ているのを、憧れの目で見つめていたが、私は間違いなく、それと同じ気持ちで、ケーブルカーの運転手達を見つめていた。 

 

When I see the hectic hurry and the complexities of presentday life, I realized how simple was life in Washington in the sixties. Mother always went to market herself, though I went occasionally on errands. Once she entrusted me with money to buy some things for the household. On my way I was lured aside by an auction sale, where the eloquent barker enticed me, and before I knew it I had bid in several gross of knives and forks made of pseudo-silver. I found that I hadn't money enough to pay for my purchase, but when I tried to explain my plight to the auctioneer, he only shouted, “This damned boy hasn't enough money!” I gave him every cent I had and went home with assortment of worthless knives and forks instead of bread and meat for the family. 

今の時代(訳注:20世紀初頭)、日々の生活は目が回るように忙しく、何事も単純には済まされない様子を見ると、1860年代のワシントンでの人々の暮らしは、とてもシンプルだったと思う。母はいつもマーケットへ自ら足を運んで買い物に出かけ、時々私が代わりにお使いに行くことも在った。ある日、母は私に、家の中のこまごまとしたものを買ってくるように、といってお金を渡してお使いに行かせた。マーケットへ向かう途中、競売会が行われていた。そのポン引きの口車に、私はまんまと引っ掛かってしまい、中へと入ってしまったのだ。気づいたときには、銀製もどきの汚いナイフとフォークの詰め合わせを落札していた。私は持ち合わせがないことに、落札してから気づいた。お金が払えないから困る、と競り人に一生懸命伝えたのだが、その男は「このガキ、金持ってねぇってよ!」と怒鳴り散らすだけだった。結局私は、有り金全部を渡す羽目になり、持っていてもしょうがないナイフとフォークの詰め合わせを家に持ち帰った。母から言いつかっていた、家族で食べるパンや肉を買って帰ることが、出来なくなってしまった。 

 

I remember well the fright of Washingtonians at the time of Early's raid, when the Confederate cannon boomed only a few miles away. Every man capable of bearing arms went out to protect the city. As for the Grand Review, after the war was over, surely no normal boy of eleven would miss that spectacle. It is as vivid today as if it all happened only yesterday. I have described it in fiction form in my novel, “Pipetown Sandy,” and I venture to quote here that account which is based on my own recollection of the impression the historic event made upon me. 

今でも記憶に鮮明なのが、ワシントンの住民を恐怖に陥れた、ジュバル・アーリー将軍による侵攻作戦である。数キロ先から、敵の南軍による砲撃の音が聞こえてきた。男性で武器を取れる者は、全員防御のため応戦に当たった。南北戦争が終わり、市内でグランドレビュー(軍のパレード)が行われた。当時私は11歳。特別な事情がない限り、私と同じ年の頃の少年達は、その圧巻の光景を見逃すまいと、パレードを見入った。それは、今でも何から何まで鮮明に覚えている。この時の様子は、拙著「パイプタウン・サンディ」で、フィクションの形でしたためてある。この歴史に残る出来事から、私自身が受けた印象について、記憶をたどって記したものを、恥を承知でここに引用してみようと思う。 

 

 

I'veBinFightin' 

私は戦ってきた 

 

It was just a little while after General Grant and General Lee had their great 'conference' at Appomattox and settled things. I guess everybody was mighty (= very) glad they talked it over and made up their mind to quit fighting each other. 

それは、グラント将軍とリー将軍が、アポマトックス方面作戦の戦闘終結の後処理を終えて、まだ日の浅い頃のことだった。人々は皆、両将軍とも会談の末、終戦にこぎつけたことに、大きな喜びを感じていたと思う。 

 

My father was reading the Evening Star after supper and he suddenly says "Jennie, I see in this here paper that the army is coming home". "The Lord be praised for that", says mom and I hope and pray they'll stay home and never go off fighting again". At which point my dad says "Amen !" 

夕食後、新聞「イブニングスター」を読んでいた父は、藪から棒に母にこういった「ジェニー、これで軍がワシントンに戻ってくるぞ。」これを聞いた母が言った「神様ありがとうって感じね。このままワシントンに留まって、もう二度と出撃して欲しくないわ。」父は「神様にアーメン、だな。」 

 

"Jennie," he says, "I feel it's almost 'Lights out' with me (= the end of my life) but if the Lord wills to let me stay till the army comes back I'm gonna put on my uniform and just go out and see them marching up the street". 

「ジェニー」父が言った「俺はもう先が長くない。だが軍が帰還するまで、神様が生かしておいてくれるって言うなら、連中が街をグランドレビューするときは、俺も軍服を着て出迎えようと思う。」 

 

My old dad was ailin' a terrible lot (= in a lot of pain) just then. Between three or four lead bullets that had never been taken out, and his sawed off leg, he was full of misery but he never died (croaked). The only way we knew he was suffering was when he would holler out in his sleep and then he wouldn't 'low (= allow =admit) he did when we told him. He would say he was just dreaming of nothing in particular but of course, we knew better. 

私の父は歳をとっていて、体のあちこちに痛みを覚えていた。鉛の銃弾が3,4発、摘出できずに体の中に残っていて、片足を失い、散々な目に遭いながらも、戦場に散ることはなかった。父がどんな目に遭ってきたか、私達がそれを知る唯一の機会がある。それは、父が寝ていると突然大声を上げることだ。私達が戦場での辛いことが夢に出てきたのでは?と言っても、認めようとしない。何でも無い夢を見ていただけだ、と言い張るのだ。だが私達家族は、重々承知であった。 

 

Sure enough the corporation (= the city) began cleaning the streets, and hanging out the bunting (=draped banners) and flags and evergreens and there were signs stuck up everywhere that said: "Welcome to the Nation's Heroes", "Welcome to the Army of the Potomac", and "Welcome to the Gallant Fifth and Sheridan's Invincibles” etc.(such like). 

グランドレビューを控え、街中の通りが清められ、横断幕や旗、それから常緑樹も植えられて、街のあちこちに、文言が踊った「歓迎 ポトマック軍」「歓迎 勇猛たる第5連隊」「歓迎 無敵のシェリダン将軍」等々 

 

The old man got out his uniform and had mom sew up the bullet holes so people wouldn't think it was motheaten or worn out and when the day came he spruced up (got cleaned up and dressed up) and me and him legs it (=walked) uptown to see the soldiers come back. 

老兵たる父は軍服を取り出すと、母に銃弾で空いた穴を繕ってもらった。人に会っても、虫食いだとかボロだなどと、思われないようにするためだ。グランドレビューの日、父は身繕いをして軍服をしっかりを着込むと、私とともにグランドレビューを見に中心街へと向かった。 

 

When we got to the Capitol, the school children were standing around on all sides waiting. The girls were all dressed in white and the boys had duck pants on and blue jackets and all of them had red white and blue rosettes (circular cloth medallions?) pinned on their shirts. Some of them had bouquets and things like that to give to the soldiers when they came along.  

We stood there a little while and heard them singing "Rally Around the Flag" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" and then the old man (=my father) said startingoff (= starting to walk) "Let's mosey along to (= move slowly) where Andy Johnson and Grant are going to review the boys. 

連邦議会議事堂までたどり着くと、児童生徒の子達が通りの端に整列して、グランドレビューを待っていた。女子は白い服、男子は青の上着にダックパンツ、そして男女とも、赤・白・青のリボンを薔薇の形にアレンジしたものをシャツに付けている。花束を持っている子達も何人かいて、兵士達が側を通ったら手渡すのだ。 

私達2人はしばらくそこに佇んでいると、子供達が「ジョニーが凱旋する時」と「自由の喊声」を歌う声が聞こえてくる。老兵は、行くぞと私に言った。「アンディ・ジョンソン(大統領)とグラント(将軍)が子供達と対面する。俺たちもゆっくり向かおう。」 

 

We kept on walking until we got up by (=near) the President's house and we stepped up, brash (=confident) as you please on a stand just across from the place were Andy Johnson and General Grant and the other big guns (generals etc.) were going to sit and look. Nobody said anything to us and we squats (=sat) right down and watched the people come piling in (=arrive in great numbers). 

ずっと歩き続けていると、ホワイトハウスの近くまできた。階段を登り、好きな場所に座って良さそうだったので、席についた。私達の向かい側は、アンディ(アンドリュー)・ジョンソン大統領やグラント将軍、その他将校クラスの面々の席のようであった。私達に声をかける人は誰もいなかった。構わずそこに座っていると、だんだんと大勢の人達が集まってきた。 

 

It was "Governor this" and "Governor that" and "Governor the other"- it was just raining governors. We weren't governors and we knew we didn't belong there but we didn't shout it out so folks could hear us and nobody noticed the difference. Before long there was some clapping and shouting and Andy Johnson and the General came out on the stand opposite (us). Then a lot of high ranking officers and such people hurried on looking very well kept (=well-groomed and clothed) and important. There were two boys among that crowd and somebody said they were the General's children. I 'spect (=expect =guess) they were awful (very) proud of their daddy for you could hear the people hollering "Grant! Grant! Hurray for Grant!" more than anything else just then. 

集まってくる人はみな、ナントカ州知事とか、カントカ州知事といった具合に、州知事ばかりであある。州知事でない私達二人は、場違いな席についてしまった。でも私達はそのことを口に出さなかったので、結局誰にも悟られずに済んでしまった。程なく、拍手と歓声が上がる。ジョンソン大統領とグラント将軍が、私達の向かい側の席の方に姿を見せる。続いて高官連中とそのたぐいの人物達がそそくさと入場、皆良い身なりをしていて、いかにも要人といった風体である。彼らの席の中に、男の子が2人いる。こちら側の席の誰かが、あの2人は将軍の子供達だと言った。丁度その時、人々が「将軍だ、将軍だ、将軍バンザイ!」と叫んでいた。きっとこの2人の男の子達は、パパのことをさぞかし誇りに思っているのだろうな。私はそう考えていた。 

 

Well sirs, we heard a rumbling down the street and we knew the army was coming. There was a fine looking general riding in front. One of the pack of governors said "There's Meade!" I'd never seen him before but I took the governor's word for it. Then came a lot of officers some clean and new looking and the others considerably soiled as they passed the President, they saluted with their swords and kept right on. 

I was wishing it would get a little exciting when lickety-split (=all of a sudden) the Devil's own horse came tearing (galloping quickly) up the street for all he was worth (=as fast as he could). He certainly looked bad. The crowd stopped cacklin' (like chickens) and rose up like swarming bees and strained their necks peekin' (to look). There was an officer on the horse with no hat on. His long blond hair was just blowing every which way; there was a great wreath hung on his left arm and that there horse was running as if Satan himself was chasing it. I was so scared I just shut my mouth for fear I'd spit out my heart! My father grabbed my arm as tight as a vise; you could see the mark a week later. 

さてここで、通りの彼方から轟音が聞こえてきた。いよいよ凱旋兵達のおでましだ。先頭の馬上には、パリッとした見た目の将軍クラスの人物。州知事席の一人が言った「軍指揮官のミード少将だ!」私は顔を見たことがなかったが、そう叫んだ州知事のいうことを信じることにした。続いて、こざっぱりと新調した軍服に身をまとった感じのする将校クラスが多数と、その他少し薄汚れたふうの兵士達が、大統領の前を通り過ぎる際、剣を捧げて敬礼の意を表する。 

突然、荒くれ馬が突っ走ってきた。私は心密かに、面白くなればいいのに、と期待した。いかにも暴れ馬という感じである。聴衆はおしゃべりを止めると、様子を見ようと首を伸ばした。将校らしき人物がその馬に乗っている。軍帽はかぶっていない。大ぶりの飾り環を左腕に付けて、馬に乗って疾走している姿は、まるでサタンそのものである。私は怖くなって、心臓が口から飛び出すのでは?と思い、口を閉じてしまった。父が思いっきり腕を強く掴んだ。おかげで一週間経っても、手の跡が残っていた。 

 

"My God, he'll be dashed to pieces!" yelled a lady, holding onto the rail. 

"Who is it?" shouted a Governor, shaking like an aspen leaf. 

"It's Custer!" bellowed an officer, jumping on a chair, mos' (=almost) dead (=extremely) from excitement. 

"That's all right!" my daddy yelled as loud as he knew how. "Sit down, and enjoy yourself". 

「何てことでしょう、あんな走り方でぶつかりでもしたら、体が粉々になってしまうわ」ある女性が、手すりを掴みながら叫んだ。 

「一体誰だ?」州知事の一人が、ポプラの葉のように身を震わせ叫んだ。 

「あれはカスター少将だ!」将校の一人が大声で叫ぶと、興奮のあまり椅子から飛び上がりそうになった。 

「うろたるな!」父は声の限り叫んだ。「いいから席につけ、グランドレビューを楽しんでいればいいんだ。」 

 

Just then the horse reared up, and when he came down I thought he was goin' heels over head (= to fall backwards). 

"Oh!" cried all the people shudderin' (shaking in fear). 

丁度その時、馬が後ろ足で立ち両前足を高くあげた。体を戻す時、馬が背中からひっくり返るかと思った。「うわぁ!」聴衆は、皆叫ぶと、恐怖に身震いしていた。 

 

"Sit down" my dad yelled again. "Sit down; it's Custer and it's all right. He doesn't ride a horse because he has to; he rides because he can". 

「座れ、」父が再び叫ぶ。「いいから座れ。カスター少将が手綱をとっているんだ、大丈夫。あいつは、やらされてやってるんじゃない、乗馬ができるから、ああして騎乗しているんだ。」 

 

For a moment you could hear a pin drop. And lo and behold we saw the General coming back and his horse was stepping soft and acting as gentle as a parson's (Christian minister's) horse on Sunday. Custer was bowing to Andy (Johnson) and Grant and the ladies as he passed and he was just as calm and smiling as if he was in a parlor. (living room) 

一瞬、完全な静寂が走る。そして驚くべきことに、少将が戻ってくるなり、彼の馬は足取りも穏やかに、まるで牧師が日曜日に馬に乗っているかのような振る舞いであった。カスター少将はジョンソン大統領とグラント将軍、およびご婦人方の前を通過すると、一礼し、まるで邸宅内のリビングでくつろぐかのような、穏やかな笑顔を見せていった。 

 

Oh my, how that crowd did clap and hurray! You would've thought there was a house on fire. My dad said he felt like he had hair clean (=completely) down his back and everyone was standing up, when he saw that horse running away but when he heard it was Custer he just laid back and could've snoozed, he felt so peaceful. Pop said Custer wouldn't know how to start getting scared. 

これによって、拍手と歓声が上がった。最初の騒ぎは、まるで火事でも起こったのか、というようなものだった。父は、はじめ聴衆が全員立ち上がったものだから、ふと見ると、馬が走り去っていったので、自分の髪の毛が背中の方に抜け落ちてゆくかと思ったという。でも騎乗しているのがカスター少将だとわかると、ゆったりすわってのんびり過ごせたのだった。カスターは聴衆が恐怖を感じていたことに、きっと気づくことはないだろうと言った。 

 

Pretty soon along comes his cav'lry, an' they cert'nly did look scrumptious with their carbines, an' sabers an' red scarfs a-danglin' sassy-like 'round their necks. They had a band, an' it was tootin' chunes that ev'rybody was keepin' time to, an' even Dad was a-pumpin' up an' down with his cork leg.  

程なくカスター少将の騎兵隊がやってくる。カービン銃を持ち、腰にはサーベル、赤いスカーフを首にゆるく巻いた姿は、実に立派である。軍楽隊を従えていて、皆がリズムを取るような(父でさえ、コルグの義足で足踏みをするほどの)よく知られた楽曲を演奏していた。 

 

After a while the Zoo-Zoos comes by, all in red trimmin's an' read tassels on the caps, an' it wuz jest great, an' the Tramp, Tramp, Tramp the Boys Are Marchin' stayed with me till I got home. Lots of the flags had crape on 'em. One of the guv'ners sed it wuz 'cause Mr. Lincoln had died, an' that wuz mighty sorrowful to ev'rybody aroun' to say nuthin' of ol'dad. 

しばらくすると軍服に赤い飾りと軍帽に赤房をつけた集団がやってきた錚々たる陣容で、「トランプ、トランプ、トランプ」にあわせて行進している。このメロディ、私が家に帰るまで耳にこびりついてしまった。旗の多くには喪章がついている。州知事の一人が、前大統領のリンカーン氏が暗殺されてしまったことに対する弔意だといった。誰もが、父も勿論言うまでもなく、深い悲しみくれた出来事である。 

 

When dad an' mum an' me was sittin' talkin' 'bout it that night, pop sez: “It wuz fine, an' no mistake.” But after he had lit his pipe, he sez: “Jest wait till to-morrer, an' then yer'll see somethin'. My army is comin'. The Bummers with Uncle Billy an' Black Jack'll be marchin' in, an' they'll make Rome howl!” Pop was powerful fond of Uncle Billy an' Black Jack, an' proud he'd been with The Bummers. When he wuz argufyin' he'd say it might be a matter o' dooty fer a sojer to lose his leg with any army, but with The Bummers it wuz a pleasure, an' I don't believe he'd a-taken it back if hell had froze over. 

その夜、父と母、そして私はグランドレビューについて話をしていた。父が言った「いやぁ、良かったよ。みんなそう思ったに違いないよ」。でも、パイプのタバコに火をつけてくゆらすと、こうも言った「いよいよ明日だ、明日が見ものだ。バンマー(従軍民間人後方支援部隊)の連中がビリーの親父とブラック・ジャックも一緒に行進するんだ。ワシントンは大歓声になるぞ!」父はアンクル・ビリーとブラック・ジャックが大そうお気に入りで、自身も彼らと同じ部隊にいたことを、今でも誇りに思っている。当時のことを話し出すと必ず、軍人が従軍中に片足を失うのは仕事のうちだが、バンマーの隊員にとっては名誉なことだ、と言う。父は死んでもなお、この信念を撤回することはないだろう。 

 

Well, sir, nex' mornin', bright an' early, me an' dad starts up, an' when we gits to the Botanical Gardens by the Tiber Creek bridge, we finds a pile o' bricks, an' they looks handy to set on, so we preempts 'em, an' we could see hunky-dory. 

翌朝、快晴の日、早い時刻に私と父は出発した。アメリカ植物庭園までやってきた。タイバークリーク橋の近くである。ちょうど頃合いのところに、レンガの台があった。そこに登って場所を確保した。眺めは上々である。 

 

At nine o'clock, “Boom!” goes the signal gun, an' afore yer got tired waitin' along comes The Bummers. They looked like they had been mos' too busy to change their fightin' clo'es. Their broad-brimmed hats looked great, an' the crowd got stuck on 'em mighty soon.  

9時になった。「ドン!」号砲が響く。そろそろ待ちくたびれていたところに、お待ちかねのバンマーがやってきた。忙しくて時間がなかったのだろうか、戦闘時の服のままのようだった。バンマーの所属するシャーマン将軍の部隊は、兵士達の軍帽は縁が広くて堂々としていた。観衆の視線は、あっという間に釘付けになった。 

 

Officers come 'long with wreaths on their horses' necks an' lots an' er the sojers had bo'kets stuck in their guns, an' Lor' alive, but they did hoof it. Yer could hear em plunk, plunk, plunk, the boys are marchin', till yer couldn't rest. 

先導する将校達は、馬の首周りに飾りをつけ、兵士達は銃口に花束を挿していた。何にしてもよかった、待ちに待った彼らが行進してきたのだ。たくましく踏み鳴らす足音が聞こえてくる。少年達が一緒に行進している。目が離せない。 

 

Well, sir, here comes a sojer marchin' 'long with his comp'ny, an' I-hope-I-may-die, if he didn't have a raccoon a-settin' on his shoulder. That raccoon jest put his face down by the side of the sojer's cheek an' looked out at the crowd, jest as sharp an' bright as yer please, an' it seemed to me he was sayin': 

一人の兵士が、相棒を連れていた。なんと肩にカコミスル(尾長のアライグマの一種)を乗せている。冗談ではなく本当に。そのカコミスルは、兵士の頬に顔を寄せて観衆をじっと見ている。そのキラリとした視線は、こう訴えているようだった。 

 

“I've bin there, I've bin there; I've bin fightin'.” 

僕も出征したよ僕も出征したよ僕も戦ってきたんだよ 

 

The crowd clapped and laughed to split their sides. Then up comes a tall sojer carrying' a flag pole, an' the flag was faded an' shot to pieces. There wuz stains on it that looked like blood, an' all at once the breeze jest flung that flag out, proud an' defiant like, an' I thought it sed, plain as possible: 

観衆は手を叩くと腹を抱えて笑った次に背の高い兵士が一人旗竿を掲げている旗は色あせ銃弾の跡がひどくてボロボロだ。血のようなシミがついている。突然、風が吹くと、旗をはためかせた。その様は、誇り高く、そして挑戦的に、こう言っているかのようだった。 

 

“I've bin there, I've bin there; I've bin fightin'.” 

自分は出征しました、自分は出征しました、自分は戦ってきました。 

 

The crowd clapped till the flag was out er sight, an' pretty soon along comes mules, an' donkeys, an' goats, an' dogs, an' cows, an'-I-hope-I-may-die if there wuzn't a rooster perched on a horse's back, an a-crowin: 

観衆は、その旗が見えなくなるまで、拍手を贈り続けた。間を置かず続くのは、軍馬、軍用ロバ、ヤギ、軍用犬、牛、そして嘘だと思うかもしれないが、雄鶏が一羽、軍馬の背に取り付けたとまり木にとまっている。その姿はあたかも、こう言っているかのようだった。 

 

“I've bin there, I've bin there; I've bin fightin'.” An' we jest went crazy, clappin'. 

俺も出征した、俺も出征した、俺も戦ってきたのだ。それを見た私達は、狂喜して手を叩いた。 

 

When the sappers an' miners comes, their blouses tucked in their pants, an' their belts tightened, an' shoulderin' their shovels, picks an' axes, we knowed they'd bin there. We knowed they had chopped, had dug, had shoveled their way to vict'ry an' to Glory Hallelujah. An' when they passed, the line comes to a halt fer a minute. My ol' dad wuz keepin' both eyes open, an' all of a sudden I seen a sojer lookin' at dad, an' he hollers out: 

土木工兵と坑夫達がやってきた。シャツをスボンに入れて、ベルトをしっかりと締めている。肩に担いでいるのは、シャベル、ピック、斧といった工具の数々だ。彼らが出征していたことは皆知っている。岩を砕き、壕を掘り、道を均して、勝利の栄光を掴む原動力になったのだ。彼らが通過しようとした時、隊列が一瞬止まった。老いた父は両目をしっかりと開けて見つめている。突然、兵士の一人が父をじっと見つめると、大声で叫んだ。 

 

“Well, I'll be damned; there's Dan Coggles!” And afore yer could say Jack Robinson, he tosses his gun to another feller, an' rushed over to dad an' honest-to-goodness, if they didn't hug each other like they wuz two mothers. 

「マジカよ、ありゃダン・コグルスだ!」そう言うやいなや、彼は近くに居た同僚に銃を渡すと、父の元へ一直線に駆け寄った。そしてお互い、子供をいたわる母のように、しっかりと抱き合ったのである。 

 

“I thought yer wuz dead, Dan,” said the sojer, as if he wuz goin' to cry. 

「生きて会えるとは思わなかったぜ、ダンよ。」その兵士は今にも泣き出しそうに、そう言った。 

 

“I heerd you wuz, Sam,” said dad, an' he wuz a-blubberin'. “No; I'm all right,” said Sam, laughin' happy like an' pattin' my head. 

「お前もな、サム。」父はそんなようなことをブツブツと言っていた。「何を言う、俺はこうしてピンピンしているさ。」サムはそう言うと、嬉しそうに笑って、今度は私の頭をなでた。 

 

“An' I'm all right, too,” said dad. He wuzn't, but he didn't let on. 

「俺もピンピンしているよ。」父はそういった。全然ピンピンなどしていなかったが、父はそれを気取られぬようにしていた。 

 

An' then I know'd the sojer was Sam Dickson who had gone to the war with dad, an' they had marched an' starved an' almost died together. I knowed it, fer one of the other sojers told me. 

ここでやっと私は、この兵士がサム・ディクソンだと知ることになる。父とともに出征し、行軍し、食料がなくて死にそうになった仲である。このことは、別の帰還兵から聞いた話である。 

 

Well, sir, what must we do, but dad jest takes his place in that 'ere comp'ny right 'long side o'Sam, an' Sam handed his gun to me, an' I walked in front a-totin' it at right-shoulder-shift, jest like all the sojers in the regiment. 

さて、何とここで、父はサムと一緒に行進することになる。サムは私に銃を手渡した。私はそれを受け取ると、連隊の他の兵士達と同様に「右担え銃」の姿勢で、前へ進み出た。 

 

An' Tramp, Tramp, Tramp the Boys Are Marchin' we went up the Av'nue. Dad stepped out jest as if he hadn't enny cork leg, an' I streched my shank's fer all I wuz worth. 

そして「トランプ、トランプ、トランプ、」にあわせて通りを行進した。父はコルクの義足であることを、全く感じさせない歩きぶりであった。私も全力でしっかりと足を伸ばして行進した。 

 

The people clapped an' clapped, an' give me a bo'ket, an' dad got a lot of 'em, an' the officer who wuz marching' right in front er the comp'ny kep' his eyes glued ahead, an' pretendin' he didn't see nothin' which cert'nly was mighty white er him 

観衆は拍手をして、私に花束をくれた。父も沢山受け取った。隊列の先頭をゆく将校は、ずっと前を向いている。何も見ないふりをしてくれているのだ。本当に、有り難くも申し訳なく思った。 

 

We wheeled round the corner. Jest as we got to the gran' stan' the officers shouted out their orders. Me an' the Bummers presented arms, an' dad s'luted as we passed the President. The crowd seemed jest crazy happy but I wuz orful lonesome, 'cause I wuz the only one in that 'ere hull review who couldn't say: 

通りの角で向きを変える。大スタンドへ差し掛かると、将校達が号令を発した。私も、バンマー達も、「捧げ銃」の姿勢を取る。大統領の前を通過する時、父は敬礼した。観衆は狂喜した。だが私は、とても寂しい気分になった。なぜなら、このレビューに登場している中で、私だけがこう言えなかったからだ。 

 

“I've bin there, I've bin there; I've bin fightin'.” 

私は出征した、私は出征した、私も戦ってきた。