スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」英日対訳

マーチ王ジョン・フィリップ・スーザの自叙伝を、英日対訳で見てゆきます。

第5章(2/2)英日対訳・スーザ自叙伝「進め! Marching Along!」

Finally the administration came to an end and General Harrison moved in. His inauguration certainly stressed the return to the simplicity of American family life as I had known it. American traditions and customs were steadily coming into their own at the White House. Few intellectual giants have graced the presidency, but General Harrison was one of them. He was a great wit. His sense of humor was ever alert, and his conversation consistently scintillating and satirical; the most brilliant speech I have ever heard was one he delivered at a Gridiron Club dinner. 

クリーブランド政権が終わり、ベンジャミン・ハリソン元准将が大統領に就任する。大統領就任式では、我が国の家族生活が、かつて重んじていた、簡素・質素を重んじる発想に戻ろう、と強調していたのを、私は記憶している。伝統的な発想や習慣が、ホワイトハウスにも着実に浸透してゆくのが見て取れた。「知的巨人」と称される人達の中には、大統領という職責を名誉であると考える人は、ほとんどいない。だが、ハリソン元准将は、「ほとんどいない」中の一人だ。知に富み、ユーモアを常に働かせ、彼が交わす言葉には、常に機知と、気の利いた物の例えが溢れていた。私が耳にしたもっとも素晴らしいスピーチは、ワシントンのグリディロン・クラブ主催の夕食会でのものだった。 

 

Mrs. Harrison impressed me with her kindhearted, considerate attitude toward those about her. She was, in every way, a splendid type of American womanhood, a personality never to be forgotten by the many who were privileged to know her. 

大統領夫人は、その優しさと思いやりにあふれる姿勢が、印象に残っている。あらゆる面で、アメリカ人女性の素晴らしさを備えており、彼女と接する栄に浴した者は、全て、その人となりが忘れられないことだろう。 

 

Certain it is, however, that there are men ready to depreciate the most admirable president. During one of my transatlantic voyages, I spent many hours on deck with a United States senator who was particularly severe in his comments on Mr. Harrison, whom I defended as best I could. I believe the man's bitterness arose from an interview which he described to me. He had called on the President a month after his inauguration and had requested him to withdraw his objections against a man whom the Senator desired to have appointed to a certain office. The President replied that he would not change his decision, and the Senator angrily retorted: 

こんなに素晴らしい大統領ではあったが、彼を揶揄するものも当然いた。私がヨーロッパへ赴いた船内でのこと、ある上院議員と長時間デッキで話をした。この議員が、ハリソン大統領に、殊の外辛辣であった。私としては、出来る限りフォローしたつもりである。その辛辣さのきっかけとなった、その上院議員と大統領とのやり取りを聞いた。大統領就任式から1ヶ月後のこと、その上院議員は、大統領に対して、あることの撤回を求めた。上院議員はある人物について、とある公職のポストへの就任を期待していた。だが、大統領がこれを拒否したのだ。大統領は上院議員の申し出に対し、決定を貫く旨回答した。上院議員は腹を立て、次のように反論した。 

 

“You seem to forget, Mr. President, that during your campaign, when the Republican party needed money badly, I went out and got it and thereby assured your election.” 

「お忘れのようですから申し上げますが、閣下が選挙戦中、共和党が極度の資金不足に陥ったのを、私は工面したから、当選したんですよね。」 

 

The President's answer was, “I appreciate your efforts, Senator, but you forget I am not President of the Republican party, but President of the United States. I must represent the people at large, and the people at large are not in favor of the appointment of the man you mention.” 

大統領は答えた「君には感謝しているよ、上院議員。だがね、お忘れなのは君の方だ。私は今や、共和党の候補ではなく、合衆国の大統領だ。国民の大半の代表であり、その意向が、その人物の公職就任を望んでいないんだよ。」 

 

“Darn the little runt!” the Senator added to me. “His posterior is too near the ground to make him great, in my estimation.” 

“Remember,” I said quietly, “size is no gauge of bravery or brains!” 

上院議員はこう言った「小男のくせに、生意気でしょ?たまたま短足でケツが地べたに近いから、胴長で大柄に見えるだけなんですよ。」私は声を荒らげず「まぁ、勇猛さと有能さは、体格で測るものじゃないでしょ。」 

 

And Mr. Harrison continued to prove in his administration that he was the President of the Unite States, and not the President of a party. 

その言葉通り、ハリソン大統領は、政権においても、国民のための職責であることを示し、党のためではないことを、ハッキリと示した。 

 

Courteous and kindhearted, he was a gracious man to meet ― if your presence was desired. He very quickly became a national hero to those who had no axes to grind. Mrs. Harrison and Mrs. McKee, his wife and daughter, followed out the custom of giving Saturday afternoon receptions during the social season ― that is, from January 1 to the beginning of Lent ―, and , in addition, an occasional children's party for "Baby” McKee, the much-talked-of despot of the White House. At one of these children's parties, the grown-ups at the mansion had evidently planned how the children were to go into the refreshment room and how they were to be seated. The President was there looking on, but when he attempted place “Baby” McKee next to a shy little girl, the ungallant baby screamed “I won't!” and broke away. 

大統領は、会ってみるとわかるが(大統領が望んで、の場合でる)、思いやりと優しさに溢れた人となりである。腹に一物など、一切持たない者にとっては、すぐさま国の英雄となった感がある。大統領夫人と娘さんのマッキー夫人は、元旦から四旬節(復活祭前の40日間)までの、社交行事が続く期間も、土曜午後のレセプション実施の慣例を、継承した。そして更には、噂に名高きホワイトハウスの「帝王」で、娘のマッキー夫人の長男の(大統領の孫)ベンジャミン、通称「マッキーちゃん」のために、子供達が集まるパーティーを開催した。その際には、ホワイトハウスの大人達は、子供達の食堂への入室方法と席順を、しっかりと決めていた。ある会で、大統領が様子を見に来た時のこと、マッキーちゃんを、ある恥ずかしがり気味の女の子との隣に座らせようとした。すると、女の子に優しくしようとしないマッキーちゃんは、「イヤだ!」といってその場を蹴って出た。 

 

After him went Mr. Harrison and pulled him back forcibly, but he decamped again. The President turned to me, “Don't play the march until I get him.” 

“Mr. President,” I replied, “it's easier to control eighty million people than that little fellow.” 

マッキーちゃんを追いかけて、大統領が力づくで連れ戻す。するとマッキーちゃんは再び逃げだす。大統領は思わず私の方を見て、「私があの子を連れ戻すまで、食堂へ入場するマーチは演奏しないでくれ給え。」私は答えた「閣下、800万の国民を御する方が、お孫さん一人よりずっと楽でしょうな。」 

 

Watch me!” the President rejoined, very decidedly. He caught the refractory youngster, held him tight, plumped him down on his feet at the head of the line, and, making him shake hands with his selected partner, started the march into the refreshment room. “Baby” McKee's sulkiness vanished at the sight of the ice cream, candies and cake. 

「さぁ、みんなこっちを見て!」大統領が戻ってきた。子供達に、しっかりと集中を促している。お騒がせ坊やをしっかりと捕まえて、食堂へと入る子供達の列の、先頭にしっかり並ばせる。そして隣の「恥ずかしがり気味の」女の子と握手をさせて、食堂へ入場するマーチが演奏される。マッキーちゃんは、アイスクリームやキャンディ、そしてケーキが目に入った途端に、ご機嫌斜めな表情が消え失せた。 

 

One drizzly day I was driving to the White House, when through my cab window I saw a short man with a big umbrella almost run down by a streetcar. As I looked, I noticed that it was President Harrison. I entered the White House, and so was awaiting him when he came in from his walk. I remarked, 

小雨が降りしきるある日のこと、私がホワイトハウスへ馬車を走らせていると、窓の外に、小柄な男性が、大きな傘をさして、鉄道馬車に轢かれそうになっていた。よくみると、何とハリソン大統領ではないか。私がホワイトハウスへ到着し、散歩に出ていたという大統領の到着を待った。大統領が戻ると、私は声をかけた。 

 

“Mr. President, I saw you a while ago picking your way across the street in the rain entirely unattended, and quite like the humblest citizen.” How different from a Presidential promenade that I had seen in Paris not long before! First there had appeared a platoon of hussars with drawn revolvers, clearing the streets. Following these at a short distance another platoon with sabres flashing. Then a hollow square of cavalry, in the centre of which was a barouche bearing President Carnot of the French Republic. 

「閣下、先程全くお一人で、通りを横切っておられるのをお見かけしました。あれでは一般市民と何ら変わりません。」この一件の少し前に、フランス大統領がパリの通りを歩いていたのとは、大違いである。まず、騎兵小隊が発砲姿勢で、通行人に道をあけさせる。次にあまり距離をおかず、サーベルの刀身を抜いた小隊が続く。次に正方陣形の騎兵隊が、中央の4頭立て馬車を護衛する。中には、カルノー大統領が乗っているのだ。 

 

We were occasionally complimented by members of the Diplomatic Corps attending White House receptions. I suppose it was tactful for them to praise the President's band. We were also very popular at the British Embassy where we played every year on the Queen's birthday. After each of these annual appearances Sir Julian Pauncefote gave the band a handsome honorarium. 

私達海兵隊バンドは、ホワイトハウスでのレセプションの際に、各国の外交団からお褒めに預かることが、時々あった。彼らにしてみれば、「大統領お抱えのバンド」にそうすることが、一つの戦略なのだろう。毎年英国大使館で人気を博したのが、女王の誕生日での演奏だ。出演の度に、サー・ジュリアン・ポーンスフット大使が、結構なお礼をくださった。 

 

There had been for some time a new commanding officer of the post at the Marine Barracks. The Barracks were divided into Headquarters and Post ― that part of the barracks on the G Street side, with offices of the various members of the staff of the Marine Corps. 

ある時、海軍工廠内のある部署に、新しい担当司令官が着任した。海軍工廠は、各本部とその下の部署とに分かれていて、新司令官が着任したのは、Gストリート側で、様々な役職にある海兵隊員達とその各部署がある。 

 

The officer in command of the post on the west side of the Barracks was Major George Porter Houston, who though soldierly in his bearing, walked lame from the effects of Chagres fever, contracted while he was in command of the Marines in Panama; one of the finest men in the Marines Corps, he was as brave as Napoleon and possessed a steely blue eye that looked clean through you. My first introduction to Major Houston was a rather trying one. I have always tried to be diplomatic, but I sometimes speak more warmly than I should; and one morning after the Major had been in command of the post for nearly three weeks, I was summoned to see the Commanding Officer. On my entrance into his office, he looked up and said sternly, 

海軍工廠西地区の、その部署に新たに配属された司令官は、ジョージ・ポーター・ヒューストン少佐という。軍人らしい佇まいだが、パナマ駐屯地の司令官時代に罹ったチャグレス熱の後遺症で、足を引きずり気味に歩いている。海兵隊きっての逸材の一人で、その勇猛さはナポレオンと肩を並べ、その青く鋭い眼差しはすべてを見通す。ヒューストン少佐に紹介された時は、どちらかというと面倒な思いをした。私はいつも、軍人としての儀礼に従う、を心がけているが、時々話し方に熱がこもり気味になる。少佐が着任後3週間程経ったある朝、私は軍令部に呼び出された。彼のオフィスに入ろうとした時、彼は私を見上げると、厳しい口調でこう言った。 

 

“You are the bandmaster?” 

“Yes, sir,” I replied. 

“Well, I want you to distinctly understand that these German dukes and Italian counts that constitute your band can't turn the barracks!” 

“I don't understand you, sir.” 

“Then I shall make myself understood. Three of them were late at the guard mount this morning, and they can't run me or the barracks, I want you to understand that!” 

「君が楽団長かね?」 

「そうです。」私は答えた。 

「この際ハッキリ理解してもらいたいことがある。君のところの、ドイツやイタリアから来たおエライサン達には、我が海軍工廠を引っ掻き回す権利はない、ということだ。」 

「仰る意味がわかりませんが。」 

「では、わかりやすく言おう。連中の内の3人が、今朝の衛兵交代の時刻に遅刻したんだ。私も海軍工廠も、彼らに振り回される覚えはない。これで理解できたかね。」 

 

I looked at him steadily and replied, “If I am not greatly mistaken, there are certain rules and regulations governing a marine be he bandsman or soldier, who fails to arrive punctually at guard mount.” He returned my gaze for fully a minute, then said, “Sit down; we'll talk this matter over.” 

私は彼をじっと見つめると、答えた「私が大きな勘違いをしていなければ、海兵隊の楽士や兵士が、衛兵交代の時刻に間に合うことができなかった場合の規定や罰則が、ちゃんとあるはずですが。」彼は私を睨み返した。1分経って、こう言った「かけ給え。この件について、じっくり話そうじゃないか。」 

 

We talked it over. His apparent anger was all assumed, and in twenty minutes Major Houston and I were the closest of friends, and remained so until his death. He had many admirable qualities. No troops were ever better fed than his. He often took some of the money intended for the purchase of beef and diverted it to oysters! He was determined that the Marines should have a varied bill of fare. 

じっくり話した結果、彼が吐き出した怒りは全て解決した。20分ほどで、ヒューストン少佐と私との間には、友人としての関係が出来上がり、少佐が亡くなるまで続いた。彼には数多く、軍人としての優れた才能がある。彼が手塩にかけた各部隊は、いずれも他の追随を許さない。食料調達に際しても、牛肉用の予算を牡蠣に回したりもする。海兵隊たるもの、バラエティに富んだ食事を口にすべきだ、というのが彼の強い信念である。 

 

The major was extremely just in all his dealings with his men; he would not tolerate deceit; but he was not over-severe in punishing dereliction of duty if it was accompanied by a truthful attitude. I remember an occasion when the first sergeant reported a man for jumping the wall, getting full of whiskey and returning to have an altercation with the guard. 

少佐は部下に対しては、極めてきっちりしている。嘘や誤魔化しには、毅然とした対応をするが、精一杯の対応の結果、任務遂行が不十分であった場合は、過剰な厳罰は絶対に適用しなかった。私が覚えている事例を一つ。所属の専任曹長が、ある兵士について報告した。壁を飛び越え、ウイスキーをしこたま調達し、戻った際に衛兵と口論になった、というのである。 

 

Houston said, “Show him in.” The door opened, and Private Smith entered, limping painfully, his head bandaged, and looking as if he had been through a threshing machine. Houston turned to me seriously and said, “Sousa, what do you think of a man, who enlists in this glorious service, the Marine Corps, receives three good meals a day, a good bed to sleep in, medical attendance when needed, and who cannot be arrested for bastardy, and yet jumps the wall, gets full of bad whiskey, comes back and assaults the sacred person of the corporal of the guard?” 

ヒューストン少佐は「彼をここへ連れてこい」。ドアが開くと、スミス二等兵が入ってきた。足を引きずる様が痛々しい。頭には包帯。小麦を脱穀する機械を通されたような有様だ。ヒューストン少佐は、深刻な面持ちで私を見て、こう言った「スーザ君、どう思う、この栄誉ある海兵隊に名を連ねて、毎日3度うまい飯を食って、心地良いベッドで寝て、病気や怪我は何でも治療を受けられて、外で子供を作っても逮捕されない、そんな人間が、壁を飛び越えて、ルール違反のウィスキーをしこたま調達して、戻ったと思ったら、自分より立場が上の伍長である衛兵と口論した、だとよ。」 

 

Of course it was my cue to look very grave, but keep silent. Turning to the culprit, Houston said, “Well, what have you to say for yourself?” The marine straightened up slowly. “I'll thank the Commanding Officer to hear my story.” Houston gave him permission to grow eloquent.  

私としては、立場上怖い顔をしているべきだが、とりあえず黙っていた。ヒューストン少佐は、容疑者たるスミス二等兵の方を見ると、こう言った「さて、何か申し開きはあるかね?」その海兵隊員は、ゆっくりと身を正すと、「司令官殿、申し開きの機会をいただき、感謝いたします。」ヒューストン少佐は彼に、目一杯言いたいことを言わせてやった。 

 

“Well, sir,” began the battered private, “I was sitting in quarters at eight last night, and I got thirsty for a drink so I went up the gate and said to the sergeant of the guard, 'I'd like to see the officer of the day.' He ordered me back to my quarters. I went back, but I was trying to figure out why I couldn't see the officer of the day, and I was getting thirstier and thirstier; so I tried again, said, 'I'd like to see the officer of the day. I want permission to leave the barracks for fifteen minutes.' 'You can't see him,' said the sergeant. 'You go back to your quarters, and the next time you come up here to see the officer of the day, I'll chuck you in the brig.' I went back to quarters, but darned if I could see why I should be chucked into the brig; so I jumped the wall, got one drink, and then I was so mad to think the sergeant had threatened to chuck me in the brig, that I took a couple more. I wasn't drunk, though. I walked up to the gate to go in and the corporal said, 'How did you get outside?' 'Jumped the wall,' I told him. He came up and said something to me that I wouldn't allow any man to say, and I struck him. He struck back, and before I realized it, there was a general rumpus, and I got the worst of it. They chucked me in the brig, and then they had to take me to the dispensary to bandage me up. But I wouldn't allow any man to say to me what he did, without fighting him back ― not if it killed me!”  

満身創痍の二等兵は、こう切り出した「司令官殿、昨夜自分は夜8時時点で、兵舎内に居りました。一杯飲みたいと思い、守衛門へ行って、警備中の軍曹殿にこう申し上げました『日番の司令官殿にお目にかかりたいのですが』。軍曹殿から、兵舎へ戻るよう命令があり、自分はそれに従いました。でもどうしても、日番の司令官殿におめにかかれない理由を知りたくて、また更には、どうしても一杯飲みたくなって、それでもう一度軍曹殿にお願いしました「日番の司令官殿にお目にかかりたいのです。15分だけ、外出許可を頂きたいのです。」軍曹殿は「ダメだ、兵舎へ戻れ。また同じことを言いに来たら、今度は牢へブチ込むぞ。」自分は兵舎へ戻りましたが、牢へ入れられるのは納得できませんでした。ですから、壁を飛び越えて、1杯だけ飲んで、軍曹殿が自分を牢へ入れる、と脅していると思うと、頭に血が上ってしまって、それで、もうあと2,3杯飲みました。でも酔ってはいませんでした。帰りは守衛門へ歩いて行き、中へ入ろうとすると、先程の伍長殿が「貴様、どうやって外へ出た?」というので「壁を飛び越えました」と答えました。すると伍長殿が近寄ってきて、とても聞くに堪えないことをおっしゃったので、私は殴ってしまいました。伍長殿が殴り返してきて、気づいたら大乱闘になっていたのです。最悪の結果が待っていました。私は牢へ入れられ、その後、医務室へ連れて行かれて、包帯措置を受けたのです。ですが、伍長殿の言葉は、到底受け入れられません。たとえ殺されても良い、そう思うと、殴り合いになってしまったのです。」 

 

Houston said quietly, “It's a serious case, Smith, and requires some thought on my part. Go back to your quarters, and I will consider the affair.” The woe-begone marine limped out dejectedly. Houston turned to the first sergeant. “Release that man from custody immediately, and see that he is sent to the hospital and properly cared for.” Then, to me, “Sousa, it's pretty damn hard to get all the cardinal virtues for thirteen dollars a month!” 

ヒューストン少佐は、黙って聞いた後「スミス二等兵、ことは重大案件である。検討に時間を要するゆえ、貴様は兵舎へ戻れ。」痛々しい姿のその海兵隊員は、がっかりした様子で、足を引きずって退室した。ヒューストン少佐は、専任曹長に対して「あの者を直ちに放免せよ。その上で、入院の上然るべき医療措置を受けさせ、貴様はそれを見届けよ。」そして私に向かい「スーザ君よ、我が軍の兵士にふさわしい礼儀人徳を維持するのに、月給15ドル(現在の3万円)じゃあ、無理だよな。」 

 

Major Houston, strange to say, was very fond of my music. One day an advertisement appeared in the Washington papers, stating that a concert would be given at Lincoln Hall by a Symphony orchestra from New York, and that the programme would consist entirely of music by American composers. When Houston looked it over, and found nothing of mine upon it, he dismissed it by saying that he knew it would be “rotten.” I defended the programme however, for there were some fine composers represented upon it, and I added, “They are from New York, and probably I am little-known there.” 

突然だが、ヒューストン少佐は、私の作った楽曲を気に入ってくれている。ある日、ワシントン市内の各新聞が、ある演奏会の広告を掲載した。会場はリンカーンホール。ニューヨークから来たシンフォニーオーケストラが演奏する。プログラムは、全てアメリカ人作曲家によるものである。ヒューストン少佐は、曲目の中に私の作品がないことを知ると、「こんなの腐れ演奏会だ」と切って捨てた。だが私はフォローし、優秀な作曲家が何人か楽曲を提供している、ということと、「オケがニューヨークからですから、おそらく私は無名なんでしょう」と付け加えた。 

 

The concert was given. Next morning, when I arrived at the barracks, the Major sent for me, and asked. “Did you play last night at the Willard?” “No, sir, I did not.” Whereupon he showed me a criticism of the concert, which stated that a reception had followed, at the Willard Hotel, and announced that the Marine Band was presented at the reception. “You answer that,” said my superior. “Let the public know it is so.” So I wrote this to the Washington Post: 

演奏会は無事に開催された。翌朝、私が海軍工廠に出仕すると、少佐が私を呼んで訊ねた「昨夜、ウィラードホテルで演奏したのかね?」「いえ、そのようなことはありませんが。」そこで少佐は、演奏会の批評を見せて、その中で、本番後ウィラードホテルでレセプションがあり、海兵隊バンドが演奏した、というのだ。少佐は「君が演奏していない、というなら、市民にそう知らしめないとな。」そこで私は、ワシントン・ポスト紙宛に、次の書簡を送った。 

 

TO THE EDITOR: 

In your account of the concert of American compositions given two evenings ago at Lincoln Hall, you state, “The Marine Band, stationed behind tall palms, played music in violent contrast to that heard earlier in the evening, at the American Composer's concert.” I desire to offer a few corrections: 

編集担当者様 

2日前にリンカーンホールで開催された、全曲アメリカ人作曲家によるコンサートの記事について、「海兵隊バンドが、ヤシの木の高木の陰で、演奏を披露したが、先に開催された全曲アメリカ人作曲家によるコンサートとは対照的に、乱暴この上ない音楽を奏でた。」とあります。これについて、いくつか修正を申し上げます。 

 

First: The Marine Band was not placed behind tall palms at the Willard Hotel. 

Second: The Marine Band did not play music in violent contrast to that heard earlier in the evening at the American Composer's concert. 

Third: The Marine Band was not present. 

Except for these errors, the article is substantially correct. 

JOHN PHILIP SOUSA 

1.海兵隊バンドは、ウィラードホテルの高いヤシの木の陰で演奏はしない。 

2.海兵隊バンドは、先に開催された全曲アメリカ人作曲家によるコンサートとは対照的に、乱暴この上ない音楽を奏でない。 

3.そもそも海兵隊バンドは、その場に出演していない。 

上記以外は、概ね記事は正しい記載内容です。 

ジョン・フィリップ・スーザ 

 

The Commandant of the Marine Corps, Colonel McCawley, suddenly went away on sick leave. I had been on the best of terms with him, although he had opposed any request I made to take the band on concert tour. The most he would allow was twenty-four hours' furlough which could carry us only as far as Richmond, Baltimore, or Philadelphia. I had applied many times for leave, but he had always refused to endorse an application to the Department for it. Since I was a member of the Marine Corps, I had no intention, even if the opportunity should present itself, of doing anything against his wishes. But as soon as he left Washington, I called on the Acting Commandant and obtained his permission to make the tour; he suggested that I call on the Secretary of the Navy. 

海兵隊バンドの司令官であるマコーリー大佐が、突如病休に入ってしまった。彼とは非常に良い関係を保っていたのだが、コンサートツアーの提案については、頑として首を縦に振らなかった。24時間以内の移動距離が、最大許容範囲であり、これではせいぜい、リッチモンドボルチモア、あるいはフィラデルフィアぐらいまでしか足を伸ばせない。これまで何度も遠征を申し出たが、彼は海軍省への取次は絶対にしてくれなかった。確かに我が意を表することにはなるが、私も海兵隊員である。別に司令官の意に反するようなことをする気は、毛頭ない。だが彼がワシントンを離れたことを確認すると、直ちに、後任の司令官にコンサートツアーの許可を取り付けてしまった。彼は私に、海軍長官へは自分で連絡をするよう、勧めてくれた。 

 

General Tracy was the Secretary, a true friend of the Band. He approved of the plan but added that I “had better see the President.” My years in Washington had taught me that if you wish to see the President, see his wife first. So I asked for Mrs. Harrison. She liked the idea of the tour, and promised to speak to the President about it. 

海軍長官のトレイシー大将は、海兵隊バンドを大いに贔屓にしてくれている。彼は計画には許可を出してくれたが、「大統領には申し上げておいたほうが良い」と付け加えた。私も長くワシントンに居たおかげで、大統領に謁見するには、まず夫人に会わねばならない、と心得ている。早速ハリソン夫人にお願いした。コンサートツアーの計画を気に入ってくださった夫人は、大統領へ話を通す約束をしてくれた。 

 

Next morning I was summoned to see the President. As I entered the room, he rose, shook hands cordially, and leading me to one of the windows which faced the Potomac River, he said, “Mrs. Harrison tells me that you are anxious to make a tour with the band. I was thinking myself of going out of town, and,” ― with a smile, ― “it would be tough on Washington if both of us were away at the same time. I have thought it over, and I believe the country would rather hear you, than me; so you have my permission to go.” 

翌朝、大統領から招集がかかる。執務室へ入ると、彼は立ち上がり、心のこもった握手をしてくれた。私を窓辺へいざなう。そこはポトマック川に面している。彼は言った「家内から聞いたよ。君が、どうしても海兵隊バンドのツアーを実施したいとね。私もワシントンから出かけようかと思ったが」ここでニコっと笑い「我々二人が、同時にワシントンを留守にするのはいかがなものか。ということで、国民も君の演奏の方が楽しみだろう。許可する。やり給え。」 

 

I immediately arranged a five weeks' tour which was a success both artistically and financially. The tour was directed by David Blakely, manager of Gilmore's Band. After we had completed our tour, Colonel McCawley, our Commandant, died. His son told me that his father had said to him, about two months before, “I see by the paper that Sousa is going on tour with his Band. He has got his own way at last!” A newspaper notice of the period gives one of our early typical programmes: 

私は直ちに5週間のツアーを立案した。結果は、演奏面でも財政面でも成功裏に終わった。ツアーの仕切り役は、デヴィッド・ブレイクリー。ギルモアバンドの団長だ。ツアー終了後、私達の司令官であるマコーリー大佐が亡くなった。ご子息の話によると、2ヶ月ほど前にこう言ったそうだ「新聞に、スーザが海兵隊バンドのコンサートツアーを実施する、とある。あいつもやっと、自分の念願がかなってよかったなぁ!」ある一紙には、ツアー前半のプログラムの一つが掲載された。 

 

The Marine Band, John Philip Sousa, Conductor, appeared at the Auditorium Theatre, Chicago, for the first of a series of three concerts, April 17, 1891. Marie Decca, Soprano, was the soloist. The band was made up of 14 B Clarinets; two flutes; two oboes; two bassoons; four saxophones; two alto clarinets; four French horns; four cornets; two trumpets; two fluegel horns; three trombones; two euphoniums; three basses and drums, triangles, tympani, etc., a rather larger proportion of wood to brass than the strictly military band calls for, made necessary, however, by the greater variety of music which Director Sousa essays. 

海兵隊バンド(ジョン・フィリップ・スーザ指揮)が、シカゴの、ルーズベルト大学講堂劇場に登壇する。1891年4月17日、3回のコンサートシリーズの幕開けである。ソリストとして、ソプラノ歌手のマリー・デッカが同行している。編成は次の通り。Bbクラリネット14、フルート2、オーボエ2、バスーン2、サクソフォン4、アルトクラリネット2、フレンチホルン4、コルネット4、トランペット2、トロンボーン3、ユーフォニアム2、チューバ2、打楽器群(大小太鼓、トライアングル、ティンパニ等)。木管楽器群を金管楽器群より充実させ、従来の軍楽隊の編成とは異なり、音楽監督のスーザの新たな挑戦により、従来より遥かに幅広い楽曲の演奏が可能になっている。 

 

PROGRAM 

RIENZI Wagner  

Invitation to the Dance Weber 

MOSAIC, The Pearl Fishers Bizet 

GRAND ARIA, Perle du Brazil David 

MARIE DECCA 

プログラム 

楽劇「リエンツィ」序曲(リヒャルト・ワーグナー 

舞踏への勧誘(カール・マリア・ウェーバー 

歌劇「真珠採り」セレクション(ジョルジュ・ビゼー 

歌劇「ブラジルの真珠」よりグランドアリア(フェリシアン・ダヴィッド) 

独唱:マリー・デッカ 

 

OVERTURE, William Tell Rossini 

Toreador et Andalouse  

  Bal Costume Rubinstein  

Funeral March of a Marionette Gounod 

SYMPHONIC POEM, Ben Hur's Chariot Race Sousa HUMORESQUE, The Contest Godfrey  

STACCATO POLKA Mulder 

歌劇「ウィリアム・テル」序曲(ジョアッキーノ・ロッシーニ 

闘牛士とアンダルシアの女 

着飾った舞踏会(以上、アントン・ルビンシテイン) 

操り人形の葬送行進曲(シャルル・グノー) 

交響詩ベン・ハーの戦車競走」(ジョン・フィリップ・スーザ 

ユーモレスク(ゴッドフリー) 

スタッカート・ポルカ(リヒャルト・ミュルデル) 

 

MARIE DECCA 

The Star Spangled Banner Arnold 

独唱:マリー・デッカ 

合衆国国歌「星条旗 

 

When the curtain rose a half hundred men were seen on stage in dress uniform of dark blue trousers, scarlet coats, liberal embellishment of silk cord, epaulets and gilt buckles. When conductor Sousa ― a stalwart and pleasant-looking gentleman, with a large sword hitched in true military fashion to his belt, came in, there was more applause. 

幕が上がると、50名ほどのメンバーが勢揃い。濃紺のスボン、真紅の上着、シルクの組紐による豪華なあしらい、肩章、金のバックルに身を包む。指揮者のスーザが登場、剛にして柔和な紳士は、軍人らしく大振りな刀身のサーベルをベルトにつけ、万雷の拍手で迎えられる。 

 

The tour was a very trying one, with two concerts a day, luncheons, banquets, civic demonstrations and incessant travel. The drain on my energy and the lack of sufficient sleep finally caused me to break down on my return, and the Post surgeon sent me to Europe to recuperate.   

このツアーは大変苦労の多いものであった。1日2回公演、昼食会と夕食会もこなし、訪問都市の住民にデモンストレーションをしたりするなど、行事がひっきりなしだった。私は体力を消耗し、しかも十分な睡眠が取れず、ワシントンに戻った時には、体を壊してしまった。分隊付軍医のはからいで、私はヨーロッパへ養生に出かけることになった。