スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」英日対訳

マーチ王ジョン・フィリップ・スーザの自叙伝を、英日対訳で見てゆきます。

第8章(2/2)英日対訳・スーザ自叙伝「進め! Marching Along」

At the close of the 1896 Manhattan Beach engagement, I needed a rest, and so Mrs. Sousa and I sailed for Europe on the Furst Bismarck. In London I was delighted to hear Hans Richter's orchestra. They gave a purely Wagner programme, with the exception of a Haydn symphony. Our own Lillian Nordica was the vocalist and sang exquisitely the Elizabeth song from Tannhaeuser. When the first part of the concert was concluded the orchestra left the stage, and at the end of the intermission there appeared, for the performance of the Haydn symphony, an orchestra of the size employed by Haydn in his day, instead of Richter's great group of a hundred men. I counted six first violins, four second, four violas, three 'cellos, four double basses, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets and tympani. This contrast between the heavier fare of Wagner, in the first part, and the delicacy of a delightful miniature orchestra in the second, pleased me exceedingly. It was rare showmanship on Richter's part. After all, that is effective in every walk of life. Men may object to being called showmen, but the history of mankind is a record of continual showmanship from the very beginning. The Queen of Sheba's appearance before Solomon was showmanship of the cleverest sort.  

1896年のマンハッタン・ビーチでの演奏契約を終えて、私も休みたいと思った。そこで、妻を連れてヨーロッパへと向かった。AGバルカン社の遠洋定期船「SSフュルスト・ビスマルク号」である。ロンドンでは、ハンス・リヒターのオーケストラを聞く機会に恵まれた。ワーグナーの作品でほぼ固めたプログラムを組んでいたが、1曲だけ、ハイドン交響曲を持ってきていた。ワーグナーといえば、私達の楽団にもリリアン・ノルディカという優秀なオペラ歌手がいて、「タンホイザー」の「エリザベートの祈り」を優美に歌ってくれている。リヒターの演奏会は、まず第一部が終わり、オーケストラが舞台裏にさがる。休憩後、ハイドン交響曲の演奏となるのだが、何と、当時の演奏規模の人数のみ登壇してきた。リヒターのオーケストラには100人規模のメンバーが居るのに、である。数えてみると、第1バイオリンが6、第2バイオリンが4,ビオラが4、チェロが3、コントラバスが4、フルート、オーボエクラリネットファゴット、ホルン、トランペットが各2、そしてティンパニ。第1部の重厚なワーグナーの演奏から、第2部の目にも楽しい可愛らしい規模のオーケストラを持ってくる繊細さは、私には殊更嬉しい限りだ。リヒターの類まれなる演出力を垣間見た。「興行師」などと呼ばれることを拒否する人も居るだろうが、人類の歴史は、その始まりから、演出の連続である。その最たるものが、ソロモン王の前に姿を現した、シバの女王であろう。 

 

And a more modern example is the recent appearance of Henry Ford as super-showman par excellence. Did not Mr. Ford hush the country into a state of breathless expectation during the weeks immediately preceding the advent of the new model Ford car? The Springfield Union caught the drama of Mr. Ford's supremely knowing gesture and said appreciatively: “With the simultaneous 'unveiling' in all cities in the United States, as well as in many foreign cities, of the new Ford models, Mr. Henry Ford takes his place as the master showman of all times. The mystery with which the new car has been surrounded, the tremendous interest aroused in this and other countries and the huge volume of newspaper publicity which has attended the change of the Ford designs constitute an advertising feat which has never been equalled .” It is indubitably true that suspense is essential to effective drama. To create a feeling of suspense is the aim of every dramatist who knows his art. Mr. Ford, like Makeda, Queen of Sheba, knew the value of surprise and used it.   

そして現代(19世紀末)、一段と優れた形で優れた演出家ぶりを発揮しているのが、最近頭角を現しているヘンリー・フォード。彼などは現代の「演出」を代表する人物だろう。フォード氏が新車のリリースに先立つ数週間、アメリカ全土が、一気に息を潜めて期待感をつのらせる状態になったであろう。「スプリングフィールド」という新聞が、フォード氏が見せた卓越した機転がもたらしたドラマを記事にし、好意的なコメントを寄せている「全米・全世界同時に、フォードの新車の「ヴェールを脱いた」ことで、ヘンリー・フォード氏のいつもながらの優れた演出家ぶりを見せつけた。新車についての情報を覆い隠す謎、全米そして全世界で高まる新車への興味関心、フォードがデザインを変更するという新聞各社の膨大な記事、これにより、過去に例を見ない大変な宣伝効果をあげた。」この事実が物語るように、「じらし」は物語性の効果を上げる。この「じらし」を醸し出すことは、自分が取り組む芸術分野をしっかりとわかっている者なら、それこそが目標となっているくらいだ。フォード氏も、そして、かのシバの女王・マケダ(ベルキス)も、「じらし」がもたらす「驚き」がいかに大切かをよく心得ていて、それを発揮したということだ。 

 

After a pilgrimage to Paris and a refreshing tour through Switzerland, we went on to the equally marvellous beauties of Italy. Having been long an admirer of Giovanni Boccaccio, the father of the modern novel, I had looked forward to seeing a performance of Suppe's opera Boccaccio, in Florence, but, alas, it was a horrible presentation in every way. One of my greatest delights while in Florence was to read again Machiavelli's life amid scenes familiar to him. I was especially impressed by one paragraph from his biographer, Villari, which made me wonder if we in America are not too lavish with education. It was: 

パリを巡り、スイスで気分転換をし、これまた素晴らしき美の宝庫・イタリアへと私達は旅を続けた。現代文学の父ジョヴァンニ・ボッカチオを長くこよなく愛する者として、私はスッペの歌劇「ボッカチオ」を、フローレンスで見たいものだと、ずっと楽しみにしていた。そしていよいよ観劇となったが、残念なことに、何を取っても酷いものだった。フローレンス滞在中の私の楽しみの一つが、彼の地で、彼が慣れ親しんだ風景について、読み慣れた本を読み返すことだった。ボッカッチョの伝記作家であるヴィラリの次の一節は特に印象深く、これを読むと、私などは、アメリカは教育の機会に恵まれすぎていると思ってしまう。 

 

“Accustomed as we are now to hear daily that knowledge and culture constitute greatness, and prove the measure of a nation's strength, we are naturally led to inquire how Italy could become so weak, so corrupt, so decayed in the midst of her intellectual and artistic preeminence.” Isn't it possible, then, that a nation may educate certain of its people beyond their intelligence? 

「知識や文化が国家の偉大さを形成し、国家の力を測る尺度である。今の私達は、毎日耳にタコができるくらい、そう聞かされている。もしそうなら、世界でも知性や芸術面で傑出するとされる中で、我が国イタリアが、ここまで弱体化し、ここまで崩壊し、ここまで腐敗しているのは何故だ?と思うのが自然だろう。」これを読んで、私が思ったのは、国家というものは、一部の人間の知性を伸ばしていけばいいのではないか?ということだ。 

 

Our arrival in Venice was timed about midnight, and we hailed a gondola exactly as we would a cab in an American city. A porter placed our trunks in the gondola, and as we glided through the dark waters, the gondolier commented on the various buildings we passed. Most of the canals are very narrow and at that late hour were dark and forbidding. The gondolier, with the dramatic instinct of the Latin, would utter a human honk as we turned sharp corners. When we passed beneath the Bridge of Sighs, he halted his gondola and uttered a peroration which neither an Italian nor an Englishman could have understood, since it was a sort of mince-meat of both language. With the Bridge of Sighs behind us, he seemed oratorically exhausted and soon brought us to the Royal Danielli hotel. 

ヴェニス到着が夜中になってしまい、私達はゴンドラ(水上タクシー)を呼び止めた。アメリカの都市部でタクシーを呼び止めるのと、同じ感覚である。ポーターが私達のトランクをゴンドラに収めてくれた。夜の水路を走り出す。漕手が水辺に並ぶいろいろな建物について、説明してくれる。市内の水路は幅が狭く、遅い時刻には、暗くて怖いものだ。漕手は、ラテン系の類まれなる本能を発揮し、きつい曲がり角を「人間警笛」さながら、声を上げて進んでゆく。名所「ためいき橋」の下をくぐる際に、漕手はゴンドラを停船すると、イタリア人はおろか、英語を話す人間にも理解不能な熱弁を振るい始めた。どうやらこれは、イタリア語と英語のちゃんぽんである。「ためいき橋」を過ぎてしまうと、彼のおしゃべりも底をついたようで、程なく、滞在先のロイヤル・ダニエリ・ホテルに到着した。 

 

One of the many attractions in Venice was the series of concerts given in the Piazza of St. Mark by Castiglioni's band. Mrs. Sousa and I, with a group of friends, were attending one of these concerts, and listening with great interest, when, to our delight, the band struck up The Washington Post. At the close of the piece, we entered a music-store not far from the bandstand and inquired for the “the piece the band had just played.” A clerk went over to the bandstand and on his return volunteered the information that it was The Washington Post. “I will take a copy,” said I. I was immediately supplied with an Italian edition by Giovanni Filipo Sousa! 

ヴェニスでは楽しみにしていたことが沢山あったが、その一つがサンマルコ広場で開催されている、カスティリオーニの吹奏楽団によるコンサートである。妻と私、そして友人達と連れ立って、そのコンサートの一つを聴いた。大変興味深い演奏会で、特に嬉しかったのは、「ワシントン・ポスト」を取り上げていたことだ。演奏が終わると、私達の一行は、コンサート会場からほど近い音楽店に入り、「今、バンドが演奏していた曲は、何ですか?」と訊いてみた。店員の一人が会場へ出向き、戻ってくると、「ワシントン・ポスト」という曲だ、と伝えてくれた。「楽譜を買います」と私が言うと、サッと出されたのが、イタリア版の「ジョヴァンニ・フィリポ・スーザ作曲」とあるではないか! 

 

“Yes,” I said, “that is what I wanted. The title-page gives the name of one Giovanni Filipo Sousa. Who is this man?” 

“Oh,” said the shopkeeper, “he is one of our most famous Italian composers.” 

Indeed! I am interested to hear it. Is he as famous as Verdi?” 

“Well, perhaps not quite as famous as Verdi; he is young yet, you see.” 

“Have you ever seen him?” I persisted. 

“I do not remember, Signor.” 

“Then,” said I, “let me introduce you to his wife. This is Signora Sousa!” 

私は言った「そうそう、これが欲しかったんですよ。表紙のジョヴァンニ・フィリポ・スーザとありますけど、誰ですかこれは?」 

店の主は言った「あぁ、彼はかなり有名なイタリア人作曲家ですよ。」 

「成程、それは興味深い。ヴェルディと同じくらい有名ですか?」 

「まぁ、ヴェルディとまでは行かないと思いますよ。まだ若手ですのでね。」 

私は続けて「彼の顔を見たことはありますか?」 

「記憶にないですね、お客様。」 

私は言った「では、彼の奥さんがここに居るので、紹介しましょう。スーザ夫人です。」 

 

And she, in turn, observed, “Permit me to introduce my husband, Signor Giovanni Filipo Sousa, the composer of the Washington Post.” There was much explanation and laughter and then the shopkeeper nobly offered to charge me only the wholesale price for a pirated copy of my own march! 

すると妻の方も、察したのか「今度は私が主人を紹介しますわ。ここに居るのが、ジョヴァンニ・フィリポ・スーザ。ワシントン・ポストの作曲者ですのよ。」ここまで説明すれば、笑いも起きるというものだ。店主は臆すること無く、楽譜代は卸値にまけておきますよ、と言ってのけた。自分の曲の海賊版を、卸値で買うとは、いやはやなんとも! 

 

We were in Rome when news came of the election of Mr. McKinley to the Presidency. The bellboys, who for a few years had not received an abundance of tips, because of the shortage of opulent American tourists, had evidently heard some fervent Republican say that prosperity would accompany the election of McKinley, for on that night they shouted, “McKinley and prosperity! Prosperity and McKinley!” 

ローマ滞在中に、アメリカではマッキンリー氏が大統領選挙で当選を果たしたというニュースを目にした。ホテルのベルボーイ達は、ここ数年チップに恵まれていない。財布の紐がゆるいアメリカ人観光客があまり来ないからだ。その少ないアメリカ人観光客の中で、共和党支持者が熱く語ったのだろう。マッキンリーが当選すれば、アメリカも裕福になると。そのせいか、マッキンリー氏当選のニュースが出た日の夜は、ベルボーイ達が「マッキンリーだ!裕福だ!裕福だ!マッキンリーだ!」と騒いでいた。 

 

Rome offered us a thousand delights; for me there was the interest of observing a choir in the Vatican rehearsing from a large book of hymns whose notation differed absolutely from the Guidonian in use today; then there were the usual little contretemps with lazy sons of Italy anent “tipping”; Mrs. Sousa drank in avidly every beauty of the Holy City, and when we went on to Naples she seemed to find a sort of Earthy Paradise in the Madonnas of the National Museum, one of which is described in my novel, The Fifth String. 

ローマ滞在中には、嬉しいことが盛り沢山だった。私は、ヴァチカンの合唱団のリハーサルを見学するのを楽しみにしていた。膨大な聖歌集から、明らかに、グイード・ダレッツォによる今日の記譜法とは全く違う楽譜を読みこなしているのだ。リハーサルを見学していると、残念なことに、おなじみのイタリア人のチップのおねだりに遭遇してしまった。ローマと言えば「聖地」、妻はその美しきものを満喫していた。ナポリを訪れた際、彼女は、国立美術館の聖母の画に、ある種「地上の楽園」を見出したようである。このことは、拙著「第5弦」にも記してある。 

 

Our preparations to leave Naples and visit Sicily were abruptly ended when I chanced upon an item in the Paris Herald, cabled from New York, saying that David Blakely, the wellknown musical manager, had dropped dead in his office the day before. The paper was four days old! I cabled at once, and Christianer replied that it was indeed our manager who had died so suddenly and that I must now be responsible for the next tour of the band. We sailed on the Teutonic for America the following Saturday. 

ナポリからシチリア島へ向かう準備をしていた時のことだった。たまたま読んだ「パリ・ヘラルド」の記事の中に、ニューヨーク発の外電として、著名な音楽マネージャーのデヴィッド・ブレイクリーが、自身のオフィスで、前日のうちに亡くなっていたことが分かった、とある。突然のシチリア島行き中止である。この新聞の記事は、4日前のことだ。私はすぐさま、国際電話をかけた。事務所に居たクリスティアーナによると、間違いなく私のマネージャーであり、亡くなったのも突然のことだったという。更に、現段階では、次のバンドのツアーは、私が切り盛りすることになるだろうとのこと。その週の土曜日には、チュートニック号にのってアメリカへ帰国の途についた。 

 

Here came one of the most vivid incidents of my career. As the vessel steamed out of the harbor I was pacing the deck, absorbed in thoughts of my manager's death and the many duties and decisions which awaited me in New York. Suddenly, I began to sense the rhythmic beat of a band playing within my brain. It kept on ceaselessly, playing, playing, playing. Throughout the whole tense voyage, that imaginary band continued to unfold the same themes, echoing and reechoing the most distinct melody. I did not transfer a note of that music to paper while I was on the steamer, but when we reached shore, I set down the measures that my brain-band had been playing for me, and not a note of it has ever been changed. The composition is known the world over as The Stars and Stripes Forever and is probably my most popular march. 

この航路中、私のキャリアに関する記憶としては、最も鮮明に覚えていることが起きた。船が港を離れる際、私は甲板上を一定のペースで歩いていた。マネージャーが亡くなったことについて、様々な思いが頭に満ち溢れ、ニューヨークに戻った際には数多くの仕事や、私が今度は決済することになることも沢山ある、などと思いを巡らせていた。と突然、脳内吹奏楽団が、リズムを刻み始めたではないか。全く止まる気配がない。ひたすら「演奏し続けている」。何かと気の張る航海だったが、その間ずっと、例の脳内吹奏楽団は、ひたすら同じ主題を演奏し続ける。何度も繰り返して、今までで一番独特なメロディを聞かせてくる。乗船中は記譜せず、接岸と同時に、脳内吹奏楽団が演奏してくれたものを、譜面に起こした。お陰様で、1音の狂いなく譜面に書き起こせた。この曲は全世界に「星条旗よ永遠なれ」として知られ、おそらく私の行進曲の中では、一番人気のあるものであろう。 

 

Following are the words I set to it ― they are sung in countless American schools and by countless singing societies throughout the world: 

以下、私がつけた歌詞である。アメリカ国内の数多くの学校や、世界各地の合唱団が歌ってくれている。 

 

THE STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER 

Let martial note in triumph float 

And liberty extend its mighty hand; 

A flag appears 'mid thunderous cheers,  

The banner of the Western land. 

星条旗よ永遠なれ 

勇ましき楽の音を、勝利の調べに乗せよ 

そして自由の女神に、その万能の手を差し伸べ賜らん 

万雷の歓声の中、現れし旗は 

古き東方の欧州と決別せし西の印 

 

The emblem of the brave and true. 

Its folds protect no tyrant crew; 

The red and white and starry blue 

Is freedom's shield and hope, 

Other nations may deem their flags the best 

And cheer them with fervid elation 

But the flag of the North and South and West  

Is the flag of flags, the flag of Freedom's nation. 

勇気と真実の徽章 

これを握れば、暴君の輩達より我らを守る 

真紅、純白、そして煌く星を散りばめし紫紺は 

自由がもたらす盾と希望なり 

諸国は自らの旗を最高とし 

これを烈火の如き意気にて讃えん 

然れども我らが南北そして西の旗こそ、至高の旗 

自由の国の旗 

 

Hurrah for the flag of the free! 

May it wave as our standard forever,  

The gem of the land and the sea,  

The banner of the right. 

Let despots remember the day 

When our fathers with mighty endeavor  

Proclaimed as they marched to the fray,  

That by their might and by their right It waves forever. 

自由の旗よ、万歳 

我らの印として、永久にはためかん 

我らが大地と海の至宝 

正義の印 

独裁者共よ、忘れるな 

あの日、我らが祖先が力を尽くし 

恐怖に立ち向かいつつ、高らかに宣言せしは 

力と正義によって、この旗は永久にはためくと 

 

Let eagle shriek from lofty peak 

The never-ending watchword of our land;  

Let summer breeze waft through the trees  

The echo of the chorus grand. 

Sing out for liberty and light, 

Sing out for freedom and the right, 

Sing out for Union and its might, 

O patriotic sons. 

Other nations may deem their flags the best  

And cheer them with fervid elation, 

But the flag of the North and South and West  

Is the flag of flags, the flag of Freedom's nation. 

高々とそびえ立つ山頂より、イーグルが轟かすのは 

我らが祖国の永遠のスローガン 

木々の間より、夏のそよ風がもたらすのは 

人々の大合唱の響き 

自由と世を照らす光明の為に歌え 

開放と正義の為に歌え 

団結とその力の為に歌え 

国を愛する者達よ 

諸国は自らの旗を最高とし 

これを烈火の如き意気にて讃えん 

然れども我らが南北そして西の旗こそ、至高の旗 

自由の国の旗 

 

Hurrah for the flag of the free! 

May it waves as our standard forever,  

The gem of the land and the sea,  

The banner of the right. 

Let despots remember the day 

When our fathers with mighty endeavor  

Proclaimed as they marched to the fray,  

That by their might and by their right It waves forever. 

自由の旗よ、万歳 

我らの印として、永久にはためかん 

我らが大地と海の至宝 

正義の印 

独裁者共よ、忘れるな 

あの日、我らが祖先が力を尽くし 

恐怖に立ち向かいつつ、高らかに宣言せしは 

力と正義によって、この旗は永久にはためくと