スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along!」英日対訳

マーチ王ジョン・フィリップ・スーザの自叙伝を、英日対訳で見てゆきます。

第13章(2)英日対訳・スーザ自叙伝「進め!Marching Along」

We left England and began playing the Nouveau Theatre in Paris. Among the various medleys which I had concocted and arranged for my band there appeared one that year called, “In the Realm of the Dance”, in which I had linked waltz themes which were at that time very popular. I placed it on the Paris programme and on the opening night I noticed three distinguished-looking men sitting together in the front row. When I started the number they manifested, one by one, an unusual degree of interest. At the end of the concert the three gentlemen sent in their names: M. Paul Lincke, M. Bosch and M. Danne, the three composers whose themes I had molded into my fantasy and who, strange to say, had come to my concert together and were pleasantly surprised by the number. 

イギリスを出発すると次はパリのヌーヴォ・テアトルから演奏を開始する。私はそれまで、自分のバンドのために様々なメドレーを作編曲してきた。その年は「踊りの輪の中で」というものを採り上げた。当時大変人気のあったワルツを数曲つなげたものだ。私はこのメドレーを、パリ公演のプログラムに入れた。初日の夜公演で、会場の最前列に、大変立派な風体の3人の男性が並んで一緒に座っている。この曲を演奏し始めると、彼らは一人また一人と、尋常ならざる興味津々な反応を見せ始めた。終演後、この3人の男性方は、私の元へ名前を明かしに来てくださった。パウル・リンケ氏、ボッシュ氏、それとダン氏である。いずれも今回のメドレーの主題を私が拝借した作曲家諸兄である。自分でこんな事を言うのはおかしいが、私の公演を一緒に見に来てくださり、今回のメドレーは良きサプライズだったのだ。 

 

After the Paris engagement we played Lille, Brussels, Ghent, Antwerp, Liége, Cologne, Berlin, Königsberg and finally opened in St. Petersburg May 16th. The audiences at the Cinicelli, where we played, were (with the exception of boys from the Westinghouse Brake Company) Russian officers, their wives, and civilian officials. The royal box, however, was draped in such a way that the occupants could not be seen. I imagine that the Czar was present several times. We gave nine performances. 

パリでの公演を終えて、私達はリール、ブリュッセル、ヘント、アントワープリエージュ、ケルン、ベルリン、ケーニヒスベルク(現・カリーニングラード)での公演を行い、いよいよ5月16日のサンクトペテルブルクでの公演の幕を開けることとなった。会場のチニゼッリ・サーカス劇場(現・サンクトペテルブルク国立ボリショイ・サーカス)には(英国ウェスティングハウス・ブレーキ・アンド・シグナル社の社員達を除いては)、ロシアの士官達とその夫人、文官達が客席に陣取る。だがロイヤルボックスには御簾が掛かり、中に誰が居るか見えないようになっている。きっとロシア皇帝が何度かお越しになられたのではないだろうか、と想像する。公演は9回行った。 

 

Before reaching St. Petersburg, I had received a telegram from my advance man, “The police authorities demand copies of the words to be sung by your vocalist. They must be forwarded immediately.” Miss Liebling sang coloratura songs in which there were many “Ahs.” I did not know the lines, aside from the fact that those “Ahs” did occur frequently. Of course I couldn’t send a telegram stating that the words were simply “Ah,” so it looked as if a Russian concert would be more difficult to give than an American one. Having to submit all programmes and advertisements to an official censor creates some awkward situations, especially when the songs are sung in half a dozen different languages. It was clear that something had to be done, so I telegraphed the words of “Annie Rooney” and “Marguerite”. Miss Liebling then overcame the difficulty by singing the words of “Annie Rooney” to the tune of the “Pearl of Brazil”. 

サンクトペテルブルクに入る前のことだった。先遣隊の男から電報が届いていた。「警察当局の要請により歌手の歌う曲の歌詞を、即刻事前提出すること。」リープリング嬢が歌うことになっているコロラトゥーラには、「ア~」が沢山出てくる。それ以外は、私は全部の歌詞が頭に入っているわけではなかった。当然、「歌詞は『ア~』だけだ」などと返電できるはずもなく、これは本国よりも、ロシアでの公演は大変そうに思えてきた。当日の演目と広告を全て監査当局へ提出しなければならないとは、気持ちが怯む状況である。特に独唱曲は、6つの言語の歌詞がついているのだ。何かしら手を打たねばならないのは明白で、私は「アニー可愛や」と「ヒナギクの唄」の歌詞を電報で送った。リープリング嬢が頑張ってくれて、「ブラジルの真珠」を、「アニー可愛や」の歌詞に置き換えて歌ってくれたのだ。 

 

Yet another annoyance awaited me in St. Petersburg—I found the city plastered with the name of some rival who seemed to have come at the same time and whose name was Cyӡa. I wondered who this Cyӡa could be, and remonstrated with my advertising agent for not seeing that I was billed as prominently. I found out that “Cyӡa was the Russian way of spelling Sousa! 

サンクトペテルブルクでは、もう1つ頭痛の種があった。街中にベタベタと貼ってあるものを見ると、私と同時期にここへやってくるのではと思われる競合相手らしき名前がある。名前はCyӡaだ。誰だこいつは?と思い、広告担当者に抗議した。これでは私が目立たないではないか。あとから分かったのだが、「Cyӡaとはロシア文字で「スーザ」なんだとか。 

 

In every country where I have played the national anthem I have awakened at once an intensity of patriotic enthusiasm, but I can remember no instance where the song of the people was received with more thrilling acclaim than in Russia. We were in St. Petersburg on the Czar’s birthday. When I entered my dressing-room in the Cirque Cinicelli, which is the equivalent of our New York Hippodrome, I found awaiting me there the secretary of the prefect of the city, who had come to request that I open the performance with the Russian national anthem. 

どこの国でも国歌を演奏すると、愛国心から来る熱狂の凄さを感じる。だがロシアの人達のそれは、飛び抜けている。私達がサンクトペテルブルクに滞在していた間に、ロシア皇帝の誕生日があった。その日、会場のチニゼッリ・サーカス劇場の指揮者室に入ると(我が国のニューヨーク・ヒッポドローム劇場に匹敵する良さだ)、待っていた人が居る。サンクトペテルブルク市行政管区長官の秘書官だ。要望があるという。開幕にロシア国歌を演奏してほしいとのことだ。 

 

“And” he added, “if it meets with a demonstration will you kindly repeat it?” 

その人はさらに「客席の反応がいいようであれば、繰り返して頂けないか?」 

 

I assured him I would. 

任せてください、とお答えした。 

 

“In fact, sir, if it meets with several demonstrations, will you repeat it again?” 

「また更に良いようであれば、更に今一度繰り返して頂けないか?」 

 

I said that I would repeat just as long as the majority applauded! 

拍手が大きい間は、何度でも繰り返しましょう、とお答えした。 

 

The audience consisted almost entirely of members of the nobility and the military, with their wives, sweethearts, sons and daughters. At the playing of the first note the entire audience rose and every man came to a salute. At the end of the anthem there was great applause and I was compelled to play the air four times before the audience was satisfied. 

客席の大半は、貴族、そして軍関係者、その妻と妾、子供達である。前奏一発目の音が鳴った瞬間、全員が起立し、敬礼した。曲が終わると、大歓声が起こる。なんと4回繰り返すことになり、ようやく落ち着いた。 

 

On retiring to my dressing-room at the end of the first part, I was again visited by the secretary who told me it was the wish of the prefect that I begin the second part of my program with the national anthem of America, and that he would have an official announce to the public beforehand the sentiment of the song. 

第1部が終わって指揮者室へ引っ込む時、先程の秘書官がまたやってきた。今度は長官の頼みだという。第2部の冒頭、アメリカ国歌を演奏してほしいという。更には、演奏に先立ち、アメリカ国歌の情趣について観客に公式に説明したいのだという。 

 

Before we began our second part, a tall Russian announced to the public the name and character of the words of “The Star Spangled Banner” and we were compelled to repeat it several times; I have never heard more sincere or lasting applause for any musical number, nor do I believe that it was ever played with more fervor, dignity and spirit than by our boys in the capital of the Russian Empire. 

第2部開演に先立ち、一人の背の高い現地の方が、観客に向けて説明を始める。「星条旗」の、曲名と歌詞の情趣についてだ。この曲も何度も繰り返し演奏することになった。これほど心のこもった、長い長い拍手喝采を頂いた楽曲は、聞いたことがない。その夜、バンドのメンバー達は、このロシア皇帝陛下のお膝元で、今までで一番の情熱・威厳・心を以て国歌演奏にあたったものと信じる。 

 

At the end of our St. Petersburg season we went to Warsaw, Poland, and opened there on May 22, 1905. I stopped at the hotel built by Mr. Paderewski and I want to congratulate the gentleman, for he had evidently admired many appointments in American hotels and installed them in his Warsaw house for the comfort of his guests. 

サンクトペテルブルクでの公演期間が終わり、私達はポーランドワルシャワへと向かった。公演初日は1905年5月22日である。私はピアノ奏者のパデレフスキー氏の建てたホテルに立ち寄った。ぜひ彼に挨拶したかったからである。彼がアメリカのホテルに在る様々な設備備品の多くを気にっているのがハッキリとわかった。彼のワルシャワのホテルにも、滞在客の歓待用に多くが採用されている。 

 

I had my troubles in Poland, however. During the intermission of my Warsaw concert, M. Jean de Reszke came back-stage with Godfrey Turner, treasurer of our organization. Mr. Turner had with him a statement of the receipts which amounted to about five thousand rubles or twenty-six hundred dollars, American money, and indignantly pointed to various items charged against the whole. There were so many hundred rubles for police tax, so many for the orphans’ tax, so many for a school tax, and so on ad infinitum. I turned to M. de Reszke and said disgustedly, “Just read this.” 

だがポーランド滞在中もトラブルが発生した。ワルシャワでの公演の休憩時間中の出来事だ。ヤン・デ・レスケ氏が舞台裏にゴッドフリー・ターナー氏と共にやってきた。ターナー氏は私達の一行の財務を担当している。レシートが5000ルーブル(2600ドル)に膨れ上がったという。更には怒りに任せて、様々な課金が予算全体にかけられているという。数百ルーブルが警察税、多額の孤児対策税、多額の学校教育税、などときりがない。私はデ・レスケ氏の方を振り向くと、腹立ち紛れにこう言った「とりあえず全部読み上げてください。」 

 

But de Reszke smilingly handed it back to me, saying, “Forget it, Sousa. You’re not in America now.” 

だがデ・レスケ氏は書類を私の方へ戻すとこう言った「気にしなくていいですよ、スーザさん。今ここはアメリカではありませんから。」 

 

From Warsaw we went to Vienna for eight concerts. After the first matinee, Mr. Emil Lindau the dramatist and brother of Paul Lindau, the poet, came to my room. We began to talk of Viennese composers and their work and I asked, “Is The Blue Danube still popular in Vienna?” 

ワルシャワからウイーンへ向かった。ここでは8回の公演が予定されている。初回の昼公演が終わった後、劇作家のエミール・リンドー氏と、その兄弟で詩人のポール・リンドー氏が訪れてくれた。ウイーンの作曲家達やその作品の数々について話が始まった時、私は訊ねた「美しく青きドナウ、は今でもウイーンでは流行っていますかね?」 

 

“Mr. Sousa, The Blue Danube will endure as long as Vienna exists!” 

「スーザさん、その曲は未来永劫、ウイーンの町とともにあり、です!」 

 

“I am glad,” I answered, “for I’m going to play it to-night as an encore.” 

私は答えた「それは何より。今夜のアンコールなんですよ。」 

 

It was certainly received with tremendous applause. One of the Viennese papers was kind enough to say that the performance of the waltz by my band was the first time it had really been heard since Johann Strauss died. 

彼らの言葉通り、大きな拍手を頂いた。ウイーン市内の各紙の1つは有り難いことに、私達のバンドによるこのワルツの演奏は、ヨハン・シュトラウス没後、最初のまともな演奏だったとのこと。 

 

I invited Mr. Lindau to dine with me and we were both pleased to discover that his wife, a Washington girl, had lived in the next block to mine and was a schoolmate of my sister, Tinnie. She was Emma Pourtales, daughter of Count Pourtales, the man who made the first survey of the Atlantic coast, and I remembered the family very well. An opera of Mr. Lindau’s, called “Frühlingsluft” was being performed in Vienna at that moment. 

リンドー氏を夕食へ招いた。嬉しことに、リンドー氏の奥様は、ワシントン出身で、私のいた隣の町会に住んでいて、私の妹のティニーとは同窓生だという。奥様の名前はエマ・プルタレスさん。お父様はプルタレス伯爵と言って、我が国の大西洋沿岸の本格的な調査を最初に行った人物である。私はこの一家をとても良く覚えていた。リンドー氏を扱ったオペラ「春風」は、私達がウイーン滞在中にその初編が行われた。 

 

Before leaving St. Petersburg I had bought a black slouch hat, much like those used by officers in the Civil War. The Vienna newspapermen all made a note of that hat. In their accounts of my arrival they described my uniform minutely and dwelt especially on the American hat I was wearing, one which, so they said, was doubtless unknown in any country except America. On looking inside the hat for the name of the maker, I found that it was manufactured in Vienna! 

サンクトペテルブルクを発つ前に、私は黒いスローチハットを買っていた。南北戦争時に士官達が使用していたものによく似ている。この帽子のことを、ウィーンの各紙が一斉に書き立てた。私のウィーン訪問の記事の中で、舞台衣装のことを細かく記していて、特に私がかぶっていたアメリカの帽子について長々と説明していた。アメリカ以外で見かけることは、まず無いだろう、とのこと。私の帽子の内側に、製造元が書いてある。ウイーン市とのことだ! 

 

From Vienna we went on to Prague where I played in the conservatory hall where Dvorák had been a professor. We played the “Largo” from the New World Symphony, and the professors were kind enough to congratulate me on my interpretation of the famous composition. 

ウイーンでの公演を終えて、プラハへ向かった。演奏会場は、かつてドヴォルザークが教鞭をとった音楽院のホールである。ここでは「新世界交響曲」の第2楽章「Largo」を演奏した。同校の先生方からは、この名曲の編曲について、有り難いお褒めのお言葉を頂いた。 

 

From there to Dresden; from Dresden to Leipsig. At Leipsig my programme was largely Wagner and Sousa. We opened with the “Tannhäuser” overture and, just as the applause began to die down, and I started to give an encore, a man seated in the first row emitted a vicious hiss. I glared at him and played my encore. With the rendition of the next Wagner piece the same vicious hissing was heard. At the intermission one of the bandsmen, stirred to anger, volunteered to go out and thrash the hisser, but I forbade him to leave the stage. When we resumed the concert, the two remaining Wagner numbers were just as vigorously hissed by the same individual. As I left the platform I encountered the local manager and asked him, “Do you know that man in the duster and straw hat?” 

プラハからドレスデン、そしてドレスデンからライプツィヒへと向かう。ライプツィヒでは私が組んだプログラムは、大半がワーグナーと私の作品で固めた。1曲目は歌劇「タンホイザー」序曲。拍手が終わるとすぐに、アンコールを演奏し始めたのだが、最前列に座っていた男性が、悪意からと思われる空気音を「シー」とやった。私は彼をじっと見やると、アンコールを演奏した。次のワーグナーの作品を演奏し終えると、また先程の「シー」だ。休憩時間に入ると、メンバーの一人が怒りのあまり、自分が行ってガツンとやってくる、という。だが私は、降壇を許さなかった。休憩が終わり演奏再開となり、残りの2曲のワーグナーの作品に対しても、その男性は「シー」」とやった。降壇すると、現地でマネージメントをしてくださっている方に、訊ねた「あのダスターコートを来て麦わら帽子をかぶった男性ですが、ご存知ですか?」 

 

He replied that he did not but would bring him to my dressing-room. He jumped down from the stage and soon had the man confronting me. 

彼はその男性を知らないと言った。だが指揮者室へ連れてくると言ってくれた。彼はステージから飛び降りると、その男性を私の前へ連れてきた。 

 

“May I ask why you hissed every Wagner number we played this evening?” I said coldly. 

私は冷ややかに訊ねた「あなたは私達が今夜演奏するワーグナーの作品に対して、なぜどの曲もあのように「シー」などとなさるんですか?」 

 

The man’s face distorted with anger and bitterness as he blurted out, “I hissed Wagner music because I hate the Wagner family.” 

その男性の表情が、怒りと憎々しさで歪み、彼はこう言い放った「ワーグナー家が悪いからだ。」 

 

Our tour now took us to Hamburg, Copenhagen, Kiel, Dortmund, Amsterdam, The Hague, and finally to our favorite England. After a few concerts in Great Britain, we sailed on July 31, 1905 from Liverpool on the “Cedric”, which arrived in New York August 8th. Before we left Liverpool, Mr. John Hargreaves honored me with a luncheon at the City Hall, at which Lord Mayor Rutherford was master of ceremonies. I was delighted when they presented me with a volume printed in 1604 and written by a distinguished ancestor of mine, Louis de Sousa. 

ヨーロッパツアーは更に、ハンブルクコペンハーゲンキールドルトムントアムステルダム、ハーグ、そして最後に私達の大好きなイングランドへと続いた。イギリス国内でいくつか公演を行った後、1905年7月31日、「セドリック号」にてリヴァプールを出発、ニューヨークへは8月8日に帰港した。リヴァプールを発つ前に、ジョン・ハーグリーブス氏が市役所で昼食会を開き、私をねぎらってくれた。司会はウィリアム・ワトソン・ラザフォード市長である。わたしが嬉しかったのは、彼らが一冊の本を進呈してくださったことだ。発行は1604年、執筆者は我が家の高名な先祖、ルイ・デ・スーザである。